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      Social Vulnerability Factors and Reported Post-Disaster Needs in the Aftermath of Hurricane Florence

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          Abstract

          This research examines the relationship between social vulnerability factors and reported needs following Hurricane Florence. Weighted least squares regression models were used to identify predictor variables for valid registrations that reported needs pertaining to emergencies, food, and shelter. Data consisted of zip codes in North Carolina and South Carolina that received individual assistance for Hurricane Florence ( N = 406). The results suggest that when controlling for event-specific factors and flood mitigation factors, the proportions of the population that is female, the population over 65, the population aged 5 and under, the population older than 5 years not speaking English, and the minority population were all predictors of the per capita reported emergency needs. When controlling for the same variables, the proportions of the population over the age of 25 with a Bachelor’s degree, the female population, the population aged 5 and under, the population above 5 years old that does not speak English, and the minority population were all predictors of the per capita reported food needs. With the same variables controlled for, three variables—the proportions of the population over 65, the population aged 5 and under, and the non-English-speaking population above 5 years of age—were all predictors of the per capita reported shelter needs. The results suggest that more attention should be given to these vulnerable populations in the pre-disaster planning process.

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          Social Vulnerability to Environmental Hazards*

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            A place-based model for understanding community resilience to natural disasters

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              Social Vulnerability and Racial Inequality in COVID-19 Deaths in Chicago

              Although the current COVID-19 crisis is felt globally, at the local level, COVID-19 has disproportionately affected poor, highly segregated African American communities in Chicago. To understand the emerging pattern of racial inequality in the effects of COVID-19, we examined the relative burden of social vulnerability and health risk factors. We found significant spatial clusters of social vulnerability and risk factors, both of which are significantly associated with the increased COVID-19-related death rate. We also found that a higher percentage of African Americans was associated with increased levels of social vulnerability and risk factors. In addition, the proportion of African American residents has an independent effect on the COVID-19 death rate. We argue that existing inequity is often highlighted in emergency conditions. The disproportionate effects of COVID-19 in African American communities are a reflection of racial inequality and social exclusion that existed before the COVID-19 crisis.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                jccrowley@wcu.edu
                Journal
                Int J Disaster Risk Sci
                International Journal of Disaster Risk Science
                Beijing Normal University Press (Beijing )
                2095-0055
                2192-6395
                3 November 2020
                3 November 2020
                : 1-11
                Affiliations
                GRID grid.268170.a, ISNI 0000 0001 0722 0389, Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice, , Western Carolina University, ; Cullowhee, NC 28723 USA
                Article
                315
                10.1007/s13753-020-00315-5
                7607545
                6b2a0e18-788a-4b4c-9a02-5654cd8691d6
                © The Author(s) 2020

                Open AccessThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                History
                : 18 October 2020
                Categories
                Article

                fema,hurricane florence,social vulnerability,post-disaster needs

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