3
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      New records of Tylokepon with the description of a new species (Epicaridea, Bopyridae, Keponinae)

      , 1 , 1 , 2

      ZooKeys

      Pensoft Publishers

      Bopyridae , Epicaridea , new records, new species, Tylokepon

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Abstract

          The parasitic isopod genus Tylokepon is recorded for the first time from the Mariana Islands and Australia. Tylokepon marianensis sp. n. is described from the Mariana Islands, infesting Thusaenys irami (Laurie, 1906). The holotype female differs from other known Tylokepon females by the tri-lobed projection on pereomere 6, almost smooth lateral plates and pleopods, shape of oostegite 1, and widely opened brood pouch. The host is first recorded for bearing bopyrids. The new record of T. bonnieri Stebbing, 1904 from Australia on the type host extends the range of this species from China and India. A table of localities and hosts and a key to all species of Tylokepon are provided.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 11

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: found
          Is Open Access

          The Global Diversity of Parasitic Isopods Associated with Crustacean Hosts (Isopoda: Bopyroidea and Cryptoniscoidea)

          Parasitic isopods of Bopyroidea and Cryptoniscoidea (commonly referred to as epicarideans) are unique in using crustaceans as both intermediate and definitive hosts. In total, 795 epicarideans are known, representing ∼7.7% of described isopods. The rate of description of parasitic species has not matched that of free-living isopods and this disparity will likely continue due to the more cryptic nature of these parasites. Distribution patterns of epicarideans are influenced by a combination of their definitive (both benthic and pelagic species) and intermediate (pelagic copepod) host distributions, although host specificity is poorly known for most species. Among epicarideans, nearly all species in Bopyroidea are ectoparasitic on decapod hosts. Bopyrids are the most diverse taxon (605 species), with their highest diversity in the North West Pacific (139 species), East Asian Sea (120 species), and Central Indian Ocean (44 species). The diversity patterns of Cryptoniscoidea (99 species, endoparasites of a diverse assemblage of crustacean hosts) are distinct from bopyrids, with the greatest diversity of cryptoniscoids in the North East Atlantic (18 species) followed by the Antarctic, Mediterranean, and Arctic regions (13, 12, and 8 species, respectively). Dajidae (54 species, ectoparasites of shrimp, mysids, and euphausids) exhibits highest diversity in the Antarctic (7 species) with 14 species in the Arctic and North East Atlantic regions combined. Entoniscidae (37 species, endoparasites within anomuran, brachyuran and shrimp hosts) show highest diversity in the North West Pacific (10 species) and North East Atlantic (8 species). Most epicarideans are known from relatively shallow waters, although some bopyrids are known from depths below 4000 m. Lack of parasitic groups in certain geographic areas is likely a sampling artifact and we predict that the Central Indian Ocean and East Asian Sea (in particular, the Indo-Malay-Philippines Archipelago) hold a wealth of undescribed species, reflecting our knowledge of host diversity patterns.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            A molecular phylogeny of Bopyroidea and Cryptoniscoidea (Crustacea: Isopoda)

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              The anomuran collections made by the Fish Hawk Expedition to Porto Rico.

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Zookeys
                Zookeys
                ZooKeys
                ZooKeys
                Pensoft Publishers
                1313-2989
                1313-2970
                2018
                15 October 2018
                : 790
                : 77-85
                Affiliations
                [1 ] School of Life Science, Shanxi Normal University, Linfen, 041000, PR China Shanxi Normal University Linfen China
                [2 ] Florida Museum of Natural History, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, 32611-7800, USA University of Florida Gainesville United States of America
                Author notes
                Corresponding author: Jianmei An ( anjianmei@ 123456hotmail.com )

                Academic editor: T. Horton

                Article
                10.3897/zookeys.790.28134
                6198033
                30364708
                Jianmei An, Miao Zhang, Gustav Paulay

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

                Categories
                Research Article
                Bopyridae
                Systematics
                Cenozoic
                Pacific

                Animal science & Zoology

                tylokepon , bopyridae , epicaridea , new records, new species

                Comments

                Comment on this article