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      Techniques and Outcomes for the Treatment of Paravalvular Leak

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          Two-year outcomes after transcatheter or surgical aortic-valve replacement.

          The Placement of Aortic Transcatheter Valves (PARTNER) trial showed that among high-risk patients with aortic stenosis, the 1-year survival rates are similar with transcatheter aortic-valve replacement (TAVR) and surgical replacement. However, longer-term follow-up is necessary to determine whether TAVR has prolonged benefits. At 25 centers, we randomly assigned 699 high-risk patients with severe aortic stenosis to undergo either surgical aortic-valve replacement or TAVR. All patients were followed for at least 2 years, with assessment of clinical outcomes and echocardiographic evaluation. The rates of death from any cause were similar in the TAVR and surgery groups (hazard ratio with TAVR, 0.90; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.71 to 1.15; P=0.41) and at 2 years (Kaplan-Meier analysis) were 33.9% in the TAVR group and 35.0% in the surgery group (P=0.78). The frequency of all strokes during follow-up did not differ significantly between the two groups (hazard ratio, 1.22; 95% CI, 0.67 to 2.23; P=0.52). At 30 days, strokes were more frequent with TAVR than with surgical replacement (4.6% vs. 2.4%, P=0.12); subsequently, there were 8 additional strokes in the TAVR group and 12 in the surgery group. Improvement in valve areas was similar with TAVR and surgical replacement and was maintained for 2 years. Paravalvular regurgitation was more frequent after TAVR (P<0.001), and even mild paravalvular regurgitation was associated with increased late mortality (P<0.001). A 2-year follow-up of patients in the PARTNER trial supports TAVR as an alternative to surgery in high-risk patients. The two treatments were similar with respect to mortality, reduction in symptoms, and improved valve hemodynamics, but paravalvular regurgitation was more frequent after TAVR and was associated with increased late mortality. (Funded by Edwards Lifesciences; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00530894.).
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            Clinical outcomes in patients undergoing percutaneous closure of periprosthetic paravalvular leaks.

            The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of the percutaneous device closure of a consecutive series of patients with periprosthetic paravalvular leaks referred to our structural heart disease center with congestive heart failure and hemolytic anemia. Clinically significant periprosthetic paravalvular leak is an uncommon but serious complication after surgical valve replacement. Percutaneous closure has been utilized as an alternative to surgical repair of this defect in high-risk surgical patients. This is a retrospective review of 57 percutaneous paravalvular leak closures that were performed in 43 patients (67% male, mean age 69.4 ± 11.7 years) between April 2006 and September 2010. Integrated imaging modalities were used for the evaluation, planning, and guidance of the interventions. Closure was successful in 86% of leaks and in 86% of patients. Twenty-eight of 35 patients improved by at least 1 New York Heart Association functional class. The percentage of patients requiring blood transfusions and/or erythropoietin injections post-procedure decreased from 56% to 5%. Clinical success was achieved in 89% of the patients in whom procedure was successful. The survival rates for patients at 6, 12, and 18 months after paravalvular leak closures were 91.9%, 89.2%, and 86.5%, respectively. Freedom from cardiac-related death at 42 months post-procedure was 91.9%. Percutaneous closure of symptomatic paravalvular leaks, facilitated by integrated imaging modalities has a high rate of acute and long-term success and appears to be effective in managing symptoms of heart failure and hemolytic anemia. Copyright © 2011 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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              Transcatheter aortic valve replacement for severe symptomatic aortic stenosis using a repositionable valve system: 30-day primary endpoint results from the REPRISE II study.

              Transcatheter aortic valve replacement provides results comparable to those of surgery in patients at high surgical risk, but complications can impact long-term outcomes. The Lotus valve, designed to improve upon earlier devices, is fully repositionable and retrievable, with a unique seal to minimize paravalvular regurgitation (PVR).
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Circulation: Cardiovascular Interventions
                Circ Cardiovasc Interv
                Ovid Technologies (Wolters Kluwer Health)
                1941-7640
                1941-7632
                August 2015
                August 2015
                : 8
                : 8
                Affiliations
                [1 ]From the Divisions of Cardiovascular Diseases and Internal Medicine (M.F.E., J.F.M., S.S., C.S.R.) and Pediatric Cardiology (A.K.C., D.J.H.), Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN.
                Article
                10.1161/CIRCINTERVENTIONS.115.001945
                26206850
                809f1631-0bcf-4ea5-9838-9634981c26e2
                © 2015
                History

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