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      Exceptional plasticity in the bulk single-crystalline van der Waals semiconductor InSe

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          Abstract

          Inorganic semiconductors are vital for a number of critical applications but are almost universally brittle. Here, we report the superplastic deformability of indium selenide (InSe). Bulk single-crystalline InSe can be compressed by orders of magnitude and morphed into a Möbius strip or a simple origami at room temperature. The exceptional plasticity of this two-dimensional van der Waals inorganic semiconductor is attributed to the interlayer gliding and cross-layer dislocation slip that are mediated by the long-range In-Se Coulomb interaction across the van der Waals gap and soft intralayer In-Se bonding. We propose a combinatory deformability indicator (Ξ) to prescreen candidate bulk semiconductors for use in next-generation deformable or flexible electronics.

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          Author and article information

          Contributors
          Journal
          Science
          Science
          American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
          0036-8075
          1095-9203
          July 30 2020
          July 31 2020
          July 30 2020
          July 31 2020
          : 369
          : 6503
          : 542-545
          Affiliations
          [1 ]State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240, China.
          [2 ]State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructure, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050, China.
          [3 ]College of Materials, Shanghai Dianji University, Shanghai 201306, China.
          [4 ]Center for Advancing Materials Performance from the Nanoscale (CAMP-Nano) and Hysitron Applied Research Center in China (HARCC), State Key Laboratory for Mechanical Behavior of Materials, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, China.
          [5 ]Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201, China.
          [6 ]Department of Physics and Astronomy, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-0978, USA.
          Article
          10.1126/science.aba9778
          © 2020

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