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      Amelioration of collagen-induced arthritis using antigen-loaded dendritic cells modified with NF-κB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides

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          Abstract

          Dendritic cells (DCs) play an important role in the initiation of autoimmunity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA); therefore, the use of DCs needs to be explored to develop new therapeutic approaches for RA. Here, we investigated the therapeutic effect of bovine type II collagen (BIIC)-loaded DCs modified with NF-κB decoy oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) on collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in rats and explored the underlying mechanisms. DCs treated with BIIC and NF-κB decoy ODNs exhibited features of immature DCs with low levels of costimulatory molecule (CD80 and CD86) expression. The development of arthritis in rats with CIA injected with BIIC + NF-κB decoy ODN-propagated DCs (BIIC–decoy DCs) was significantly ameliorated compared to that in rats injected with BIIC-propagated DCs or phosphate-buffered saline. We also found that the BIIC–decoy DCs exerted antiarthritis effects by inhibiting self-lymphocyte proliferative response and suppressing IFN-γ and anti-BIIC antibody production and inducing IL-10 antibody production. Additionally, antihuman serum antibodies were successfully produced in the rats treated with BIIC–decoy DCs but not in those treated with NF-κB decoy ODN-propagated DCs; moreover, the BIIC–decoy DCs did not affect immune function in the normal rats. These findings suggested that NF-κB decoy ODN-modified DCs loaded with a specific antigen might offer a practical method for the treatment of human RA.

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          Most cited references 21

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          Antigen-Specific Inhibition of Effector T Cell Function in Humans after Injection of Immature Dendritic Cells

          Immunostimulatory properties of dendritic cells (DCs) are linked to their maturation state. Injection of mature DCs rapidly enhances antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell immunity in humans. Here we describe the immune response to a single injection of immature DCs pulsed with influenza matrix peptide (MP) and keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) in two healthy subjects. In contrast to prior findings using mature DCs, injection of immature DCs in both subjects led to the specific inhibition of MP-specific CD8+ T cell effector function in freshly isolated T cells and the appearance of MP-specific interleukin 10–producing cells. When pre- and postimmunization T cells were boosted in culture, there were greater numbers of MP-specific major histocompatibility complex tetramer-binding cells after immunization, but these had reduced interferon γ production and lacked killer activity. These data demonstrate the feasibility of antigen-specific inhibition of effector T cell function in vivo in humans and urge caution with the use of immature DCs when trying to enhance tumor or microbial immunity.
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            Dendritic cell immunotherapy: mapping the way.

            Dendritic cells (DCs) are the professional antigen-presenting cells of the immune system, with the potential to either stimulate or inhibit immune responses. Exploiting the immune-regulatory capacities of dendritic cells holds great promise for the treatment of cancer, autoimmune diseases and the prevention of transplant rejection. Although early clinical trials indicate that DC vaccines can induce immune responses in some cancer patients, careful study design and use of standardized clinical and immunological criteria are needed.
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              Development of Th1-inducing capacity in myeloid dendritic cells requires environmental instruction.

              Dendritic cells (DC) are key initiators of primary immune responses. Myeloid DC can secrete IL-12, a potent Th1-driving factor, and are often viewed as Th1-promoting APC. Here we show that neither a Th1- nor a Th2-inducing function is an intrinsic attribute of human myeloid DC, but both depend on environmental instruction. Uncommitted immature DC require exposure to IFN-gamma, at the moment of induction of their maturation or shortly thereafter, to develop the capacity to produce high levels of IL-12p70 upon subsequent contact with naive Th cells. This effect is specific for IFN-gamma and is not shared by other IL-12-inducing factors. Type 1-polarized effector DC, matured in the presence of IFN-gamma, induce Th1 responses, in contrast to type 2-polarized DC matured in the presence of PGE2 that induce Th2 responses. Type 1-polarized effector DC are resistant to further modulation, which may facilitate their potential use in immunotherapy.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Dove Medical Press
                1177-8881
                2017
                13 October 2017
                : 11
                : 2997-3007
                Affiliations
                [1 ]School of Clinical Laboratory Science, Guizhou Medical University, Guiyang, Guizhou
                [2 ]Department of Clinical Laboratory, The Third Hospital Subsidiary of Bengbu Medical College, Suzhou, Anhui
                [3 ]School of Biology and Engineering, Guizhou Medical University, Guiyang, Guizhou, People’s Republic of China
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Hongmei Jiang, School of Clinical Laboratory Science, Guizhou Medical University, 9 Beijing Road, Yunyan District, Guiyang, Guizhou 550004, People’s Republic of China, Tel +86 139 8412 6067, Email jhmzq1973@ 123456163.com
                Article
                dddt-11-2997
                10.2147/DDDT.S145421
                5648311
                © 2017 Jiang et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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