5
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Basal Insulin Peglispro and Insulin Glargine in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Previously Treated With Basal Insulin: IMAGINE 5

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          To evaluate the efficacy and safety of basal insulin peglispro (BIL) versus insulin glargine in patients with type 2 diabetes (hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c] ≤9% [75 mmol/mol]) treated with basal insulin alone or with three or fewer oral antihyperglycemic medications.

          Related collections

          Most cited references25

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          The treat-to-target trial: randomized addition of glargine or human NPH insulin to oral therapy of type 2 diabetic patients.

          To compare the abilities and associated hypoglycemia risks of insulin glargine and human NPH insulin added to oral therapy of type 2 diabetes to achieve 7% HbA(1c). In a randomized, open-label, parallel, 24-week multicenter trial, 756 overweight men and women with inadequate glycemic control (HbA(1c) >7.5%) on one or two oral agents continued prestudy oral agents and received bedtime glargine or NPH once daily, titrated using a simple algorithm seeking a target fasting plasma glucose (FPG)
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Three-year efficacy of complex insulin regimens in type 2 diabetes.

            Evidence supporting the addition of specific insulin regimens to oral therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus is limited. In this 3-year open-label, multicenter trial, we evaluated 708 patients who had suboptimal glycated hemoglobin levels while taking metformin and sulfonylurea therapy. Patients were randomly assigned to receive biphasic insulin aspart twice daily, prandial insulin aspart three times daily, or basal insulin detemir once daily (twice if required). Sulfonylurea therapy was replaced by a second type of insulin if hyperglycemia became unacceptable during the first year of the study or subsequently if glycated hemoglobin levels were more than 6.5%. Outcome measures were glycated hemoglobin levels, the proportion of patients with a glycated hemoglobin level of 6.5% or less, the rate of hypoglycemia, and weight gain. Median glycated hemoglobin levels were similar for patients receiving biphasic (7.1%), prandial (6.8%), and basal (6.9%) insulin-based regimens (P=0.28). However, fewer patients had a level of 6.5% or less in the biphasic group (31.9%) than in the prandial group (44.7%, P=0.006) or in the basal group (43.2%, P=0.03), with 67.7%, 73.6%, and 81.6%, respectively, taking a second type of insulin (P=0.002). [corrected] Median rates of hypoglycemia per patient per year were lowest in the basal group (1.7), higher in the biphasic group (3.0), and highest in the prandial group (5.7) (P<0.001 for the overall comparison). The mean weight gain was higher in the prandial group than in either the biphasic group or the basal group. Other adverse event rates were similar in the three groups. Patients who added a basal or prandial insulin-based regimen to oral therapy had better glycated hemoglobin control than patients who added a biphasic insulin-based regimen. Fewer hypoglycemic episodes and less weight gain occurred in patients adding basal insulin. (Current Controlled Trials number, ISRCTN51125379.) 2009 Massachusetts Medical Society
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Use of twice-daily exenatide in Basal insulin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized, controlled trial.

              Insulin replacement in diabetes often requires prandial intervention to reach hemoglobin A₁(c) (HbA₁(c)) targets. To test whether twice-daily exenatide injections reduce HbA₁(c) levels more than placebo in people receiving insulin glargine. Parallel, randomized, placebo-controlled trial, blocked and stratified by HbA₁(c) level at site, performed from October 2008 to January 2010. Participants, investigators, and personnel conducting the study were masked to treatment assignments. (ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT00765817) 59 centers in 5 countries. Adults with type 2 diabetes and an HbA₁(c) level of 7.1% to 10.5% who were receiving insulin glargine alone or in combination with metformin or pioglitazone (or both agents). Assignment by a centralized, computer-generated, random-sequence interactive voice-response system to exenatide, 10 µg twice daily, or placebo for 30 weeks. The primary outcome was change in HbA₁(c) level. Secondary outcomes included the percentage of participants with HbA₁(c) values of 7.0% or less and 6.5% or less, 7-point self-monitored glucose profiles, body weight, waist circumference, insulin dose, hypoglycemia, and adverse events. 112 of 138 exenatide recipients and 101 of 123 placebo recipients completed the study. The HbA₁(c) level decreased by 1.74% with exenatide and 1.04% with placebo (between-group difference, -0.69% [95% CI, -0.93% to -0.46%]; P < 0.001). Weight decreased by 1.8 kg with exenatide and increased by 1.0 kg with placebo (between-group difference, -2.7 kg [CI, -3.7 to -1.7]). Average increases in insulin dosage with exenatide and placebo were 13 U/d and 20 U/d. The estimated rate of minor hypoglycemia was similar between groups. Thirteen exenatide recipients and 1 placebo recipient discontinued the study because of adverse events (P < 0.010); rates of nausea (41% vs. 8%), diarrhea (18% vs. 8%), vomiting (18% vs. 4%), headache (14% vs. 4%), and constipation (10% vs. 2%) were higher with exenatide than with placebo. The study was of short duration. There were slight imbalances between groups at baseline in terms of sex, use of concomitant glucose-lowering medications, and HbA₁(c) levels, and more exenatide recipients than placebo recipients withdrew because of adverse events. Adding twice-daily exenatide injections improved glycemic control without increased hypoglycemia or weight gain in participants with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes who were receiving insulin glargine treatment. Adverse events of exenatide included nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, headache, and constipation. Alliance of Eli Lilly and Company and Amylin Pharmaceuticals.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Diabetes Care
                Dia Care
                American Diabetes Association
                0149-5992
                1935-5548
                December 22 2015
                January 2016
                January 2016
                November 17 2015
                : 39
                : 1
                : 92-100
                Article
                10.2337/dc15-1531
                26577417
                9365d07c-84ac-4ec8-a9a2-3c7f171debbe
                © 2015

                Comments

                Comment on this article