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      The uncertain state of work in the U.S.: Profiles of decent work and precarious work

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          Abstract

          This research utilized a person-centered approach to identify profiles of decent work and precarious work, which were explored due to their centrality in current debates about the uncertain state of work conditions in the U.S. Using the Decent Work Scale and the Precarious Work Scale, the following five profiles were identified from a sample of 492 working Americans: 1) Indecent-Precarious; 2) Highly Decent; 3) Low Health Care-Low Rights; 4) Vulnerability-Dominant; 5) Health Care-Stability. These profiles were further elaborated by examining the relationship of theoretically-informed predictors and outcomes that would distinguish profile membership. Using psychology of working theory as an organizing framework for determining predictors and outcomes, the findings revealed that work volition, age, income level, and educational level significantly predicted profile membership, and autonomy, social contribution, survival needs, job satisfaction, and life satisfaction differed meaningfully across the profiles. Implications for theory, research, practice, and public policy are discussed highlighting the complexity of work conditions and their relationship to various aspects of vocational and psychological functioning.

          Highlights

          • Precarious work and decent work represent two related conditions of work.
          • People vary in the degree to which they have access to precarious and decent work.
          • Decent and stable work conditions are associated with work volition and well-being.
          • Decent and stable work are associated with social class and educational attainment.

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          Most cited references 26

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            Latent Class Modeling with Covariates: Two Improved Three-Step Approaches

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              Explaining the relationships between job characteristics, burnout, and engagement: The role of basic psychological need satisfaction

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                J Vocat Behav
                J Vocat Behav
                Journal of Vocational Behavior
                Published by Elsevier Inc.
                0001-8791
                1095-9084
                26 August 2020
                26 August 2020
                Affiliations
                [a ]Boston College, United States of America
                [b ]University of Nevada-Las Vegas, United States of America
                Author notes
                [* ]Corresponding author at: Department of Counseling, Developmental, and Educational Psychology, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA 02467, United States of America. David.Blustein@ 123456bc.edu
                Article
                S0001-8791(20)30106-8 103481
                10.1016/j.jvb.2020.103481
                7449123
                © 2020 Published by Elsevier Inc.

                Since January 2020 Elsevier has created a COVID-19 resource centre with free information in English and Mandarin on the novel coronavirus COVID-19. The COVID-19 resource centre is hosted on Elsevier Connect, the company's public news and information website. Elsevier hereby grants permission to make all its COVID-19-related research that is available on the COVID-19 resource centre - including this research content - immediately available in PubMed Central and other publicly funded repositories, such as the WHO COVID database with rights for unrestricted research re-use and analyses in any form or by any means with acknowledgement of the original source. These permissions are granted for free by Elsevier for as long as the COVID-19 resource centre remains active.

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