54
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      Systemic sclerosis

      ,
      The Lancet
      Elsevier BV

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Systemic sclerosis, also called scleroderma, is an immune-mediated rheumatic disease that is characterised by fibrosis of the skin and internal organs and vasculopathy. Although systemic sclerosis is uncommon, it has a high morbidity and mortality. Improved understanding of systemic sclerosis has allowed better management of the disease, including improved classification and more systematic assessment and follow-up. Additionally, treatments for specific complications have emerged and a growing evidence base supports the use of immune suppression for the treatment of skin and lung fibrosis. Some manifestations of the disease, such as scleroderma renal crisis, pulmonary arterial hypertension, digital ulceration, and gastro-oesophageal reflux, are now treatable. However, the burden of non-lethal complications associated with systemic sclerosis is substantial and is likely to become more of a challenge. Here, we review the clinical features of systemic sclerosis and describe the best practice approaches for its management. Furthermore, we identify future areas for development.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          The Lancet
          The Lancet
          Elsevier BV
          01406736
          October 2017
          October 2017
          : 390
          : 10103
          : 1685-1699
          Article
          10.1016/S0140-6736(17)30933-9
          28413064
          95f55471-51ca-40ea-9745-26338c8b8dc7
          © 2017

          https://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

          History

          Comments

          Comment on this article