Blog
About

  • Record: found
  • Abstract: found
  • Article: found
Is Open Access

Repurposing of approved cardiovascular drugs

Read this article at

Bookmark
      There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

      Abstract

      Research and development of new drugs requires both long time and high costs, whereas safety and tolerability profiles make the success rate of approval very low. Drug repurposing, applying known drugs and compounds to new indications, has been noted recently as a cost-effective and time-unconsuming way in developing new drugs, because they have already been proven safe in humans. In this review, we discuss drug repurposing of approved cardiovascular drugs, such as aspirin, beta-blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, cardiac glycosides and statins. Regarding anti-tumor activities of these agents, a number of experimental studies have demonstrated promising pleiotropic properties, whereas all clinical trials have not shown expected results. In pathological conditions other than cancer, repurposing of cardiovascular drugs is also expanding. Numerous experimental studies have reported possibilities of drug repurposing in this field and some of them have been tried for new indications (‘bench to bedside’), while unexpected results of clinical studies have given hints for drug repurposing and some unknown mechanisms of action have been demonstrated by experimental studies (‘bedside to bench’). The future perspective of experimental and clinical studies using cardiovascular drugs are also discussed.

      Related collections

      Most cited references 157

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Effect of daily aspirin on long-term risk of death due to cancer: analysis of individual patient data from randomised trials.

      Treatment with daily aspirin for 5 years or longer reduces subsequent risk of colorectal cancer. Several lines of evidence suggest that aspirin might also reduce risk of other cancers, particularly of the gastrointestinal tract, but proof in man is lacking. We studied deaths due to cancer during and after randomised trials of daily aspirin versus control done originally for prevention of vascular events. We used individual patient data from all randomised trials of daily aspirin versus no aspirin with mean duration of scheduled trial treatment of 4 years or longer to determine the effect of allocation to aspirin on risk of cancer death in relation to scheduled duration of trial treatment for gastrointestinal and non-gastrointestinal cancers. In three large UK trials, long-term post-trial follow-up of individual patients was obtained from death certificates and cancer registries. In eight eligible trials (25 570 patients, 674 cancer deaths), allocation to aspirin reduced death due to cancer (pooled odds ratio [OR] 0·79, 95% CI 0·68-0·92, p=0·003). On analysis of individual patient data, which were available from seven trials (23 535 patients, 657 cancer deaths), benefit was apparent only after 5 years' follow-up (all cancers, hazard ratio [HR] 0·66, 0·50-0·87; gastrointestinal cancers, 0·46, 0·27-0·77; both p=0·003). The 20-year risk of cancer death (1634 deaths in 12 659 patients in three trials) remained lower in the aspirin groups than in the control groups (all solid cancers, HR 0·80, 0·72-0·88, p<0·0001; gastrointestinal cancers, 0·65, 0·54-0·78, p<0·0001), and benefit increased (interaction p=0·01) with scheduled duration of trial treatment (≥7·5 years: all solid cancers, 0·69, 0·54-0·88, p=0·003; gastrointestinal cancers, 0·41, 0·26-0·66, p=0·0001). The latent period before an effect on deaths was about 5 years for oesophageal, pancreatic, brain, and lung cancer, but was more delayed for stomach, colorectal, and prostate cancer. For lung and oesophageal cancer, benefit was confined to adenocarcinomas, and the overall effect on 20-year risk of cancer death was greatest for adenocarcinomas (HR 0·66, 0·56-0·77, p<0·0001). Benefit was unrelated to aspirin dose (75 mg upwards), sex, or smoking, but increased with age-the absolute reduction in 20-year risk of cancer death reaching 7·08% (2·42-11·74) at age 65 years and older. Daily aspirin reduced deaths due to several common cancers during and after the trials. Benefit increased with duration of treatment and was consistent across the different study populations. These findings have implications for guidelines on use of aspirin and for understanding of carcinogenesis and its susceptibility to drug intervention. None. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
        Bookmark
        • Record: found
        • Abstract: not found
        • Article: not found

        Propranolol for severe hemangiomas of infancy.

          Bookmark
          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Expanding consensus in portal hypertension: Report of the Baveno VI Consensus Workshop: Stratifying risk and individualizing care for portal hypertension.

            Bookmark

            Author and article information

            Affiliations
            Innovative Clinical Trials, Department of Cardiology and Pneumology, University Medical Centre Göttingen, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, 37075 Göttingen, Germany
            Contributors
            ORCID: http://orcid.org/0000-0001-9703-9419, +49 (0) 551 39-66380 , juishida-circ@umin.ac.jp
            m_koni524@hotmail.com
            nicole.ebner@med.uni-goettingen.de
            jochen.springer@med.uni-goettingen.de
            Journal
            J Transl Med
            J Transl Med
            Journal of Translational Medicine
            BioMed Central (London )
            1479-5876
            20 September 2016
            20 September 2016
            2016
            : 14
            27646033
            5029061
            1031
            10.1186/s12967-016-1031-5
            © The Author(s) 2016

            Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

            Categories
            Review
            Custom metadata
            © The Author(s) 2016

            Comments

            Comment on this article