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      Colorectal cancer statistics, 2017.

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          Abstract

          Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common malignancies in the United States. Every 3 years, the American Cancer Society provides an update of CRC incidence, survival, and mortality rates and trends. Incidence data through 2013 were provided by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program, the National Program of Cancer Registries, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries. Mortality data through 2014 were provided by the National Center for Health Statistics. CRC incidence rates are highest in Alaska Natives and blacks and lowest in Asian/Pacific Islanders, and they are 30% to 40% higher in men than in women. Recent temporal patterns are generally similar by race and sex, but differ by age. Between 2000 and 2013, incidence rates in adults aged ≥50 years declined by 32%, with the drop largest for distal tumors in people aged ≥65 years (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.50; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.48-0.52) and smallest for rectal tumors in ages 50 to 64 years (male IRR, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.85-0.96; female IRR, 1.00; 95% CI, 0.93-1.08). Overall CRC incidence in individuals ages ≥50 years declined from 2009 to 2013 in every state except Arkansas, with the decrease exceeding 5% annually in 7 states; however, rectal tumor incidence in those ages 50 to 64 years was stable in most states. Among adults aged <50 years, CRC incidence rates increased by 22% from 2000 to 2013, driven solely by tumors in the distal colon (IRR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.13-1.35) and rectum (IRR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.13-1.31). Similar to incidence patterns, CRC death rates decreased by 34% among individuals aged ≥50 years during 2000 through 2014, but increased by 13% in those aged <50 years. Progress against CRC can be accelerated by increasing initiation of screening at age 50 years (average risk) or earlier (eg, family history of CRC/advanced adenomas) and eliminating disparities in high-quality treatment. In addition, research is needed to elucidate causes for increasing CRC in young adults. CA Cancer J Clin 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:177-193. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          CA Cancer J Clin
          CA: a cancer journal for clinicians
          American Cancer Society
          1542-4863
          0007-9235
          May 06 2017
          : 67
          : 3
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Strategic Director, Surveillance Information Services, Surveillance and Health Services Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.
          [2 ] Epidemiologist, Surveillance and Health Services Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.
          [3 ] Director, Screening and Risk Factor Surveillance, Surveillance and Health Services Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.
          [4 ] Professor, Division of Gastroenterology, School of Medicine, University of Colorado, Aurora, CO.
          [5 ] Epidemiologist, Department of Public Health, Erasmus University, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
          [6 ] Assistant Professor of Clinical Medicine, Department of Medicine, Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA.
          [7 ] Vice President, Surveillance and Health Services Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA.
          Article
          10.3322/caac.21395
          28248415

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