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      Scene Perception in the Human Brain

      1 , 2

      Annual Review of Vision Science

      Annual Reviews

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          Abstract

          Humans are remarkably adept at perceiving and understanding complex real-world scenes. Uncovering the neural basis of this ability is an important goal of vision science. Neuroimaging studies have identified three cortical regions that respond selectively to scenes: parahippocampal place area, retrosplenial complex/medial place area, and occipital place area. Here, we review what is known about the visual and functional properties of these brain areas. Scene-selective regions exhibit retinotopic properties and sensitivity to low-level visual features that are characteristic of scenes. They also mediate higher-level representations of layout, objects, and surface properties that allow individual scenes to be recognized and their spatial structure ascertained. Challenges for the future include developing computational models of information processing in scene regions, investigating how these regions support scene perception under ecologically realistic conditions, and understanding how they operate in the context of larger brain networks.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Annual Review of Vision Science
          Annu. Rev. Vis. Sci.
          Annual Reviews
          2374-4642
          2374-4650
          June 21 2019
          September 16 2019
          June 21 2019
          September 16 2019
          : 5
          : 1
          Affiliations
          [1 ]Department of Psychology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA;
          [2 ]Section on Learning and Plasticity, Laboratory of Brain and Cognition, National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA;
          Article
          10.1146/annurev-vision-091718-014809
          © 2019

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