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      Dietary arginine silicate inositol complex increased bone healing: histologic and histomorphometric study

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          Abstract

          Background

          Arginine silicate inositol complex (ASI; arginine 49.5%, silicon 8.2%, and inositol 25%) is a novel material that is a bioavailable source of silicon and arginine. ASI offers potential benefits for vascular and bone health.

          Objective

          The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential effects of ASI complex on bone healing of critical-sized defects in rats.

          Methods

          The rats were randomly assigned to two groups of 21 rats each. The control group was fed a standard diet for 12 weeks; after the first 8 weeks, a calvarial critical-sized defect was created, and the rats were sacrificed 7, 14, and 28 days later. The ASI group was fed a diet containing 1.81 g/kg of ASI for 12 weeks; after the first 8 weeks, a calvarial critical-sized defect was created, and the rats were sacrificed 7, 14, and 28 days later. The calvarial bones of all the rats were then harvested for evaluation.

          Results

          Osteoblasts and osteoclasts were detected at higher levels in the ASI group compared with the control group at days 7, 14, and 28 of the calvarial defect ( P<0.05). New bone formation was detected at higher levels in the ASI group compared with the controls at day 28 ( P<0.05). However, new bone formation was not detected at days 7 and 14 in both the groups ( P>0.05).

          Conclusion

          ASI supplementation significantly improved bone tissue healing in rats with critical-sized defects. This study demonstrated that ASI can enhance bone repair and has potential as a therapeutic regimen in humans.

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          Most cited references 29

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          Silicon: a possible factor in bone calcification.

           Anna Carlisle (1970)
          Silicon, a relatively unknown trace element in nutritional research, has been uniquely localized in active calcification sites in young bone. Silicon increases directly with calcium at relatively low calcium concentrations and falls below the detection limit at compositions approaching hydroxyapatite. It is suggested that silicon is associated with calcium in an early stage of calcification.
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            Growth-promoting effects of silicon in rats.

             D Milne,  Lisa Schwarz (1972)
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              Silicon: an essential element for the chick.

               Anna Carlisle (1972)
              Silicon is required for normal growth and development in the chick when a low silicon diet is fed in a trace element controlled environment. Day-old deutectomized cockerels fed a purified amino acid diet showed significantly retarded growth and development within 2 to 3 weeks. Chicks fed the same diet plus a silicon supplement showed 50 percent higher growth and normal development. Silicon meets the criteria for an essential trace element.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Dove Medical Press
                1177-8881
                2016
                27 June 2016
                : 10
                : 2081-2086
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Oral-Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, Dicle University, Diyarbakir, Turkey
                [2 ]Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, Firat University, Elazig, Turkey
                [3 ]Department of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Firat University, Elazig, Turkey
                [4 ]Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, Dicle University, Diyarbakir, Turkey
                [5 ]Nutrition 21, LLC, Purchase, NY, USA
                [6 ]Department of Animal Nutrition, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Firat University, Elazig, Turkey
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Ferhan Yaman, Department of Oral-Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, Dicle University, Diyarbakir, 21280, Turkey, Tel +90 50 6123 9845, Email dtferhan@ 123456hotmail.com
                Article
                dddt-10-2081
                10.2147/DDDT.S109271
                4930222
                27390517
                © 2016 Yaman et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

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                Original Research

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