7
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Spotlight on dupilumab in the treatment of atopic dermatitis: design, development, and potential place in therapy

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Atopic dermatitis (AD) is among the most common inflammatory skin diseases in children and adults in industrialized countries. Up to one-third of adults (probably a smaller proportion in childhood) suffer from moderate-to-severe AD, whose recommended treatment is usually based on systemic therapies. The currently available therapeutics are limited, and AD management becomes challenging in most cases. Over the last few years, new advances in the understanding of AD pathogenic mechanisms and inflammatory pathways have led to the identification of specific therapeutic targets and new molecules have been tested. Dupilumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody directed against the IL-4 receptor α subunit that is able to block the signaling of both IL-4 and IL-13 and achieve rapid and significant improvements in adults with moderate-to-severe AD. Dupilumab is ready to inaugurate a long and promising biological target treatment option for Th2 cell-mediated atopic immune response that characterizes AD.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 33

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Atopic dermatitis: a disease of altered skin barrier and immune dysregulation.

          Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an important chronic or relapsing inflammatory skin disease that often precedes asthma and allergic disorders. New insights into the genetics and pathophysiology of AD point to an important role of structural abnormalities in the epidermis as well as immune dysregulation not only for this skin disease but also for the development of asthma and allergies. Patients with AD have a unique predisposition to colonization or infection by microbial organisms, most notably Staphylococcus aureus and herpes simplex virus. Measures directed at healing and protecting the skin barrier and addressing the immune dysregulation are essential in the treatment of patients with AD, and early intervention may improve outcomes for both the skin disease as well as other target organs. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Eczema prevalence in the United States: data from the 2003 National Survey of Children's Health.

            Using the 2003 National Survey of Children's Health sponsored by the federal Maternal and Child Health Bureau, we calculated prevalence estimates of eczema nationally and for each state among a nationally representative sample of 102,353 children 17 years of age and under. Our objective was to determine the national prevalence of eczema/atopic dermatitis in the US pediatric population and to further examine geographic and demographic associations previously reported in other countries. Overall, 10.7% of children were reported to have a diagnosis of eczema in the past 12 months. Prevalence ranged from 8.7 to 18.1% between states and districts, with the highest prevalence reported in many of the East Coast states, as well as in Nevada, Utah, and Idaho. After adjusting for confounders, metropolitan living was found to be a significant factor in predicting a higher disease prevalence with an odds ratio of 1.67 (95% confidence interval of 1.19-2.35, P=0.008). Black race (odds ratio 1.70, P=0.005) and education level in the household greater than high school (odds ratio 1.61, P=0.004) were also significantly associated with a higher prevalence of eczema. The wide range of prevalence suggests that social or environmental factors may influence disease expression.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              New insights into the epidemiology of childhood atopic dermatitis.

               C Flohr,  Graham Mann (2013)
              There is a growing desire to explain the worldwide rise in the prevalence of atopic dermatitis (AD). Trend data on the burden of AD suggest that the picture in the developing world may soon resemble that of wealthier nations, where AD affects over 20% of children. This, combined with significant variations in prevalence within countries, emphasizes the importance of environmental factors. Many hypotheses have been explored, from the modulation of immune priming by hygiene, gut microbiota diversity, and exposure to endotoxins through farm animals to the effects of pollution, climate, and diet. The discovery of the filaggrin skin barrier gene and its importance in AD development and severity has brought the focus on gene-environment interactions and the identification of environmental factors that impact on skin barrier function. This article reviews our current understanding of the epidemiology of AD, with an emphasis on the findings reported in the international literature over the last 5 years. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Des Devel Ther
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Drug Design, Development and Therapy
                Dove Medical Press
                1177-8881
                2017
                15 May 2017
                : 11
                : 1473-1480
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Dermatology Unit, Livorno Hospital, Livorno
                [2 ]Dermatology Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Angelo Massimiliano D’Erme, Dermatology Unit, Livorno Hospital, Viale Alfieri, Livorno 57124, Italy, Tel +39 34 9845 1303, Email a.m.derme@ 123456gmail.com
                Article
                dddt-11-1473
                10.2147/DDDT.S113192
                5439982
                © 2017 D’Erme et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

                Categories
                Review

                Pharmacology & Pharmaceutical medicine

                biologics, il-13, il-4, eczema, atopic dermatitis, dupilumab

                Comments

                Comment on this article