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      Stretchable, Skin-Mountable, and Wearable Strain Sensors and Their Potential Applications: A Review

      , , ,
      Advanced Functional Materials
      Wiley-Blackwell

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          Laser scribing of high-performance and flexible graphene-based electrochemical capacitors.

          Although electrochemical capacitors (ECs), also known as supercapacitors or ultracapacitors, charge and discharge faster than batteries, they are still limited by low energy densities and slow rate capabilities. We used a standard LightScribe DVD optical drive to do the direct laser reduction of graphite oxide films to graphene. The produced films are mechanically robust, show high electrical conductivity (1738 siemens per meter) and specific surface area (1520 square meters per gram), and can thus be used directly as EC electrodes without the need for binders or current collectors, as is the case for conventional ECs. Devices made with these electrodes exhibit ultrahigh energy density values in different electrolytes while maintaining the high power density and excellent cycle stability of ECs. Moreover, these ECs maintain excellent electrochemical attributes under high mechanical stress and thus hold promise for high-power, flexible electronics.
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            A stretchable carbon nanotube strain sensor for human-motion detection.

            Devices made from stretchable electronic materials could be incorporated into clothing or attached directly to the body. Such materials have typically been prepared by engineering conventional rigid materials such as silicon, rather than by developing new materials. Here, we report a class of wearable and stretchable devices fabricated from thin films of aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes. When stretched, the nanotube films fracture into gaps and islands, and bundles bridging the gaps. This mechanism allows the films to act as strain sensors capable of measuring strains up to 280% (50 times more than conventional metal strain gauges), with high durability, fast response and low creep. We assembled the carbon-nanotube sensors on stockings, bandages and gloves to fabricate devices that can detect different types of human motion, including movement, typing, breathing and speech.
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              Embedded 3D printing of strain sensors within highly stretchable elastomers.

              A new method, embedded-3D printing (e-3DP), is reported for fabricating strain sensors within highly conformal and extensible elastomeric matrices. e-3DP allows soft sensors to be created in nearly arbitrary planar and 3D motifs in a highly programmable and seamless manner. Several embodiments are demonstrated and sensor performance is characterized. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Advanced Functional Materials
                Adv. Funct. Mater.
                Wiley-Blackwell
                1616301X
                March 2016
                March 2016
                : 26
                : 11
                : 1678-1698
                Article
                10.1002/adfm.201504755
                d7d77ea9-1990-4bde-a31d-efa8bcb0fcf8
                © 2016

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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