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      Local proliferation maintains a stable pool of tissue-resident memory T cells after antiviral recall responses

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          Most cited references 39

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          Memory T cells in nonlymphoid tissue that provide enhanced local immunity during infection with herpes simplex virus.

          Effective immunity is dependent on long-surviving memory T cells. Various memory subsets make distinct contributions to immune protection, especially in peripheral infection. It has been suggested that T cells in nonlymphoid tissues are important during local infection, although their relationship with populations in the circulation remains poorly defined. Here we describe a unique memory T cell subset present after acute infection with herpes simplex virus that remained resident in the skin and in latently infected sensory ganglia. These T cells were in disequilibrium with the circulating lymphocyte pool and controlled new infection with this virus. Thus, these cells represent an example of tissue-resident memory T cells that can provide protective immunity at points of pathogen entry.
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            The developmental pathway for CD103(+)CD8+ tissue-resident memory T cells of skin.

            Tissue-resident memory T cells (T(RM) cells) provide superior protection against infection in extralymphoid tissues. Here we found that CD103(+)CD8(+) T(RM) cells developed in the skin from epithelium-infiltrating precursor cells that lacked expression of the effector-cell marker KLRG1. A combination of entry into the epithelium plus local signaling by interleukin 15 (IL-15) and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) was required for the formation of these long-lived memory cells. Notably, differentiation into T(RM) cells resulted in the progressive acquisition of a unique transcriptional profile that differed from that of circulating memory cells and other types of T cells that permanently reside in skin epithelium. We provide a comprehensive molecular framework for the local differentiation of a distinct peripheral population of memory cells that forms a first-line immunological defense system in barrier tissues.
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              Distribution and compartmentalization of human circulating and tissue-resident memory T cell subsets.

              Knowledge of human T cells derives chiefly from studies of peripheral blood, whereas their distribution and function in tissues remains largely unknown. Here, we present a unique analysis of human T cells in lymphoid and mucosal tissues obtained from individual organ donors, revealing tissue-intrinsic compartmentalization of naive, effector, and memory subsets conserved between diverse individuals. Effector memory CD4(+) T cells producing IL-2 predominated in mucosal tissues and accumulated as central memory subsets in lymphoid tissue, whereas CD8(+) T cells were maintained as naive subsets in lymphoid tissues and IFN-γ-producing effector memory CD8(+) T cells in mucosal sites. The T cell activation marker CD69 was constitutively expressed by memory T cells in all tissues, distinguishing them from circulating subsets, with mucosal memory T cells exhibiting additional distinct phenotypic and functional properties. Our results provide an assessment of human T cell compartmentalization as a new baseline for understanding human adaptive immunity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature Immunology
                Nat Immunol
                Springer Nature
                1529-2908
                1529-2916
                February 2018
                January 8 2018
                : 19
                : 2
                : 183-191
                Article
                10.1038/s41590-017-0027-5
                © 2018

                http://www.springer.com/tdm

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