Blog
About

36
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      The Temporal Relation between Cardiomyopathy and LBBB and Response to Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy: Case Series and Literature Review

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background: Left bundle branch block (LBBB)-induced cardiomyopathy has been proposed, but the association between LBBB and cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) response remains unclear and practical criteria for selecting CRT candidates are needed.

          Methods: One hundred and seventeen consecutive heart failure patients were reviewed, 24 of whom received CRT. Only two patients had a clear temporal relation between cardiomyopathy and LBBB.

          Results: Compared with the patient with “cardiomyopathy-induced LBBB,” the patient with “LBBB-induced cardiomyopathy” had higher left ventricular (LV) wall thickness, higher LV wall thickening rate, higher peak circumferential strain, and longer peak circumferential strain delay. The LV deformation patterns in the two patients were obviously distinct on cardiovascular magnetic resonance tissue tracking. During follow-up, the patient with LBBB-induced cardiomyopathy had a good response to CRT (LV ejection fraction 23 before CRT vs. 30% at 6 months vs. 29 at 12 months vs. 32% at 18 months; LV end-diastolic diameter 77 mm before CRT vs. 66 mm at 6 months vs. 62 mm at 12 months vs. 63 mm at 18 months), and the other patient had no response to CRT (LV ejection fraction 29 before CRT vs. 29% at 6 months vs. 26 at 12 months vs. 22% at 24 months; LV end-diastolic diameter 85 mm before CRT vs. 88 mm at 6 months vs. 85 mm at 12 months vs. 84 mm at 24 months).

          Conclusion: The temporal relation between cardiomyopathy and LBBB could be a determinant for CRT response. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance tissue tracking may be a useful tool to identify the chronological order and a principal consideration for selecting candidates for CRT. Larger prospective clinical trials are needed to study the prevalence of, time course of, and risk factors for LBBB-induced cardiomyopathy.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 24

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Cardiac-resynchronization therapy for the prevention of heart-failure events.

          This trial was designed to determine whether cardiac-resynchronization therapy (CRT) with biventricular pacing would reduce the risk of death or heart-failure events in patients with mild cardiac symptoms, a reduced ejection fraction, and a wide QRS complex. During a 4.5-year period, we enrolled and followed 1820 patients with ischemic or nonischemic cardiomyopathy, an ejection fraction of 30% or less, a QRS duration of 130 msec or more, and New York Heart Association class I or II symptoms. Patients were randomly assigned in a 3:2 ratio to receive CRT plus an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) (1089 patients) or an ICD alone (731 patients). The primary end point was death from any cause or a nonfatal heart-failure event (whichever came first). Heart-failure events were diagnosed by physicians who were aware of the treatment assignments, but they were adjudicated by a committee that was unaware of assignments. During an average follow-up of 2.4 years, the primary end point occurred in 187 of 1089 patients in the CRT-ICD group (17.2%) and 185 of 731 patients in the ICD-only group (25.3%) (hazard ratio in the CRT-ICD group, 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.52 to 0.84; P=0.001). The benefit did not differ significantly between patients with ischemic cardiomyopathy and those with nonischemic cardiomyopathy. The superiority of CRT was driven by a 41% reduction in the risk of heart-failure events, a finding that was evident primarily in a prespecified subgroup of patients with a QRS duration of 150 msec or more. CRT was associated with a significant reduction in left ventricular volumes and improvement in the ejection fraction. There was no significant difference between the two groups in the overall risk of death, with a 3% annual mortality rate in each treatment group. Serious adverse events were infrequent in the two groups. CRT combined with ICD decreased the risk of heart-failure events in relatively asymptomatic patients with a low ejection fraction and wide QRS complex. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00180271.) 2009 Massachusetts Medical Society
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            An individual patient meta-analysis of five randomized trials assessing the effects of cardiac resynchronization therapy on morbidity and mortality in patients with symptomatic heart failure

            Aims Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) with or without a defibrillator reduces morbidity and mortality in selected patients with heart failure (HF) but response can be variable. We sought to identify pre-implantation variables that predict the response to CRT in a meta-analysis using individual patient-data. Methods and results An individual patient meta-analysis of five randomized trials, funded by Medtronic, comparing CRT either with no active device or with a defibrillator was conducted, including the following baseline variables: age, sex, New York Heart Association class, aetiology, QRS morphology, QRS duration, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and systolic blood pressure. Outcomes were all-cause mortality and first hospitalization for HF or death. Of 3782 patients in sinus rhythm, median (inter-quartile range) age was 66 (58–73) years, QRS duration was 160 (146–176) ms, LVEF was 24 (20–28)%, and 78% had left bundle branch block. A multivariable model suggested that only QRS duration predicted the magnitude of the effect of CRT on outcomes. Further analysis produced estimated hazard ratios for the effect of CRT on all-cause mortality and on the composite of first hospitalization for HF or death that suggested increasing benefit with increasing QRS duration, the 95% confidence bounds excluding 1.0 at ∼140 ms for each endpoint, suggesting a high probability of substantial benefit from CRT when QRS duration exceeds this value. Conclusion QRS duration is a powerful predictor of the effects of CRT on morbidity and mortality in patients with symptomatic HF and left ventricular systolic dysfunction who are in sinus rhythm. QRS morphology did not provide additional information about clinical response. ClinicalTrials.gov numbers NCT00170300, NCT00271154, NCT00251251.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Characterization of left ventricular activation in patients with heart failure and left bundle-branch block.

              Conventional activation mapping in the dilated human left ventricle (LV) with left bundle-branch block (LBBB) morphology is incomplete given the limited number of recording sites that may be collected in a reasonable time and given the lack of precision in marking specific anatomic locations. We studied LV activation sequences in 24 patients with heart failure and LBBB QRS morphology with simultaneous application of 3D contact and noncontact mapping during intrinsic rhythm and asynchronous pacing. Approximately one third of the patients with typical LBBB QRS morphology had normal transseptal activation time and a slightly prolonged or near-normal LV endocardial activation time. A "U-shaped" activation wave front was present in 23 patients because of a line of block that was located anteriorly (n=12), laterally (n=8), and inferiorly (n=3). Patients with a lateral line of block had significantly shorter QRS (P<0.003) and transseptal durations (P<0.001) and a longer distance from the LV breakthrough site to line of block (P<0.03). Functional behavior of the line of block was demonstrated by a change in its location during asynchronous ventricular pacing at different sites and cycle lengths. A U-shaped conduction pattern is imposed on the LV activation sequence by a transmural functional line of block located between the LV septum and the lateral wall with a prolonged activation time. Assessment of functional block is facilitated by noncontact mapping, which may be useful for identifying and targeting specific locations that are optimal for successful cardiac resynchronization therapy.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                CVIA
                Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications
                CVIA
                Compuscript (Ireland )
                2009-8782
                2009-8618
                January 2020
                March 2020
                : 4
                : 3
                : 163-172
                Affiliations
                1Department of Cardiology, Beijing AnZhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, National Clinical Research Centre for Cardiovascular Diseases, Beijing, China
                2Department of Radiology, Beijing AnZhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, National Clinical Research Centre for Cardiovascular Diseases, Beijing, China
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Prof. Jianzeng Dong, Beijing AnZhen Hospital, Capital Medical University, No 2 AnZhen Road, Chaoyang District, 100029 Beijing, China, Tel.: +86+13911828375, Fax: +86-10-64456078, E-mail: jz_dong@ 123456126.com
                Article
                cvia20190560
                10.15212/CVIA.2019.0560
                Copyright © 2020 Cardiovascular Innovations and Applications

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 Unported License (CC BY-NC 4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. See https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/.

                Product
                Categories
                Reviews

                Comments

                Comment on this article