Blog
About

2
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      Links Among Human Health, Animal Health, and Ecosystem Health

      1 , 2

      Annual Review of Public Health

      Annual Reviews

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          In the face of growing world human and animal populations and rapid environmental change, the linkages between human, animal, and environmental health are becoming more evident. Because animals and humans have shared risk to health from changing environments, it seems logical to expand the perspective of public health beyond a single species to detect and manage emerging public health threats. Mitigating the effects of climate change, emerging pathogens, toxicant releases, and changes in the built environment requires a retooling of global public health resources and capabilities across multiple species. Furthermore, human and animal health professionals must overcome specific barriers to interprofessional collaboration to implement needed health strategies. This review outlines the relationships between human, animal, and ecosystem health and the public health challenges and opportunities that these links present.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 43

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Emerging Infectious Diseases of Wildlife-- Threats to Biodiversity and Human Health

           P. Daszak (2000)
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Surveillance Sans Frontières: Internet-Based Emerging Infectious Disease Intelligence and the HealthMap Project

            John Brownstein and colleagues discuss HealthMap, an automated real-time system that monitors and disseminates online information about emerging infectious diseases.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found
              Is Open Access

              Agricultural intensification, priming for persistence and the emergence of Nipah virus: a lethal bat-borne zoonosis

              Emerging zoonoses threaten global health, yet the processes by which they emerge are complex and poorly understood. Nipah virus (NiV) is an important threat owing to its broad host and geographical range, high case fatality, potential for human-to-human transmission and lack of effective prevention or therapies. Here, we investigate the origin of the first identified outbreak of NiV encephalitis in Malaysia and Singapore. We analyse data on livestock production from the index site (a commercial pig farm in Malaysia) prior to and during the outbreak, on Malaysian agricultural production, and from surveys of NiV's wildlife reservoir (flying foxes). Our analyses suggest that repeated introduction of NiV from wildlife changed infection dynamics in pigs. Initial viral introduction produced an explosive epizootic that drove itself to extinction but primed the population for enzootic persistence upon reintroduction of the virus. The resultant within-farm persistence permitted regional spread and increased the number of human infections. This study refutes an earlier hypothesis that anomalous El Niño Southern Oscillation-related climatic conditions drove emergence and suggests that priming for persistence drove the emergence of a novel zoonotic pathogen. Thus, we provide empirical evidence for a causative mechanism previously proposed as a precursor to widespread infection with H5N1 avian influenza and other emerging pathogens.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Annual Review of Public Health
                Annu. Rev. Public Health
                Annual Reviews
                0163-7525
                1545-2093
                March 18 2013
                March 18 2013
                : 34
                : 1
                : 189-204
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06510; email:
                [2 ]Global One Health Solutions, Tallahassee, Florida 32317; email:
                Article
                10.1146/annurev-publhealth-031912-114426
                23330700
                © 2013

                Comments

                Comment on this article