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      A cross-cultural examination of presenteeism and supervisory support

      , ,
      Career Development International
      Emerald

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          Chinese Values and the Search for Culture-Free Dimensions of Culture

          (2016)
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            Stressors, resources, and strain at work: a longitudinal test of the triple-match principle.

            Two longitudinal studies investigated the issue of match between job stressors and job resources in the prediction of job-related strain. On the basis of the triple-match principle (TMP), it was hypothesized that resources are most likely to moderate the relation between stressors and strains if resources, stressors, and strains all match. Resources are less likely to moderate the relation between stressors and strains if (a) only resources and stressors match, (b) only resources and strains match, or (c) only stressors and strains match. Resources are least likely to moderate the relation between stressors and strains if there is no match among stressors, resources, and strains. The TMP was tested among 280 and 267 health care workers in 2 longitudinal surveys. The likelihood of finding moderating effects was linearly related to the degree of match, with 33.3% of all tested interactions becoming significant when there was a triple match, 16.7% when there was a double match, and 0.0% when there was no match. Findings were most consistent if there was an emotional match or a physical match. (c) 2006 APA, all rights reserved
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              Attendance dynamics at work: the antecedents and correlates of presenteeism, absenteeism, and productivity loss.

              Gary Johns (2011)
              Presenteeism is attending work when ill. This study examined the antecedents and correlates of presenteeism, absenteeism, and productivity loss attributed to presenteeism. Predictors included work context, personal characteristics, and work experiences. Business school graduates employed in a variety of work positions (N = 444) completed a Web-based survey. Presenteeism was positively associated with task significance, task interdependence, ease of replacement, and work to family conflict and negatively associated with neuroticism, equity, job security, internal health locus of control, and the perceived legitimacy of absence. Absenteeism was positively related to task significance, perceived absence legitimacy, and family to work conflict and negatively related to task interdependence and work to family conflict. Those high on neuroticism, the unconscientious, the job-insecure, those who viewed absence as more legitimate, and those experiencing work-family conflict reported more productivity loss. Overall, the results reveal the value of a behavioral approach to presenteeism over and above a strict medical model. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Career Development International
                Career Dev Int
                Emerald
                1362-0436
                September 16 2013
                September 16 2013
                : 18
                : 5
                : 440-456
                Article
                10.1108/CDI-03-2013-0031
                f41b28a5-5616-4937-96c1-028d376ea934
                © 2013

                http://www.emeraldinsight.com/page/tdm

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