Blog
About

7
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      High-Resolution Microfluidic Paper-Based Analytical Devices for Sub-Microliter Sample Analysis

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          This work demonstrates the fabrication of microfluidic paper-based analytical devices (µPADs) suitable for the analysis of sub-microliter sample volumes. The wax-printing approach widely used for the patterning of paper substrates has been adapted to obtain high-resolution microfluidic structures patterned in filter paper. This has been achieved by replacing the hot plate heating method conventionally used to melt printed wax features into paper by simple hot lamination. This patterning technique, in combination with the consideration of device geometry and the influence of cellulose fiber direction in filter paper, led to a model µPAD design with four microfluidic channels that can be filled with as low as 0.5 µL of liquid. Finally, the application to a colorimetric model assay targeting total protein concentrations is shown. Calibration curves for human serum albumin (HSA) were recorded from sub-microliter samples (0.8 µL), with tolerance against ±0.1 µL variations in the applied liquid volume.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 25

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Patterned paper as a platform for inexpensive, low-volume, portable bioassays.

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Paper-based microfluidic point-of-care diagnostic devices.

            Dipstick and lateral-flow formats have dominated rapid diagnostics over the last three decades. These formats gained popularity in the consumer markets due to their compactness, portability and facile interpretation without external instrumentation. However, lack of quantitation in measurements has challenged the demand of existing assay formats in consumer markets. Recently, paper-based microfluidics has emerged as a multiplexable point-of-care platform which might transcend the capabilities of existing assays in resource-limited settings. However, paper-based microfluidics can enable fluid handling and quantitative analysis for potential applications in healthcare, veterinary medicine, environmental monitoring and food safety. Currently, in its early development stages, paper-based microfluidics is considered a low-cost, lightweight, and disposable technology. The aim of this review is to discuss: (1) fabrication of paper-based microfluidic devices, (2) functionalisation of microfluidic components to increase the capabilities and the performance, (3) introduction of existing detection techniques to the paper platform and (4) exploration of extracting quantitative readouts via handheld devices and camera phones. Additionally, this review includes challenges to scaling up, commercialisation and regulatory issues. The factors which limit paper-based microfluidic devices to become real world products and future directions are also identified.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Understanding wax printing: a simple micropatterning process for paper-based microfluidics.

              This technical note describes a detailed study on wax printing, a simple and inexpensive method for fabricating microfluidic devices in paper using a commercially available printer and hot plate. The printer prints patterns of solid wax on the surface of the paper, and the hot plate melts the wax so that it penetrates the full thickness of the paper. This process creates complete hydrophobic barriers in paper that define hydrophilic channels, fluid reservoirs, and reaction zones. The design of each device was based on a simple equation that accounts for the spreading of molten wax in paper.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Role: Academic Editor
                Role: Academic Editor
                Journal
                Micromachines (Basel)
                Micromachines (Basel)
                micromachines
                Micromachines
                MDPI
                2072-666X
                02 May 2016
                May 2016
                : 7
                : 5
                micromachines-07-00080
                10.3390/mi7050080
                6189915
                © 2016 by the authors.

                Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland. This article is an open access article distributed under the terms and conditions of the Creative Commons Attribution (CC-BY) license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/).

                Categories
                Article

                Comments

                Comment on this article