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      The avant-garde in the architecture and visual arts of Post-Revolutionary Mexico

      Architecture_MPS

      UCL Press

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          Abstract

          Commenting on an exhibition of contemporary Mexican architecture in Rome in 1957, the polemic and highly influential Italian architectural critic and historian, Bruno Zevi, ridiculed Mexican modernism for combining Pre-Columbian motifs with modern architecture. He referred to it as ‘Mexican Grotesque’. Inherent in Zevi’s comments were an attitude towards modern architecture that defined it in primarily material terms; its principle role being one of “spatial and programmatic function”. Despite the weight of this Modernist tendency in the architectural circles of Post-Revolutionary Mexico, we suggest in this paper that Mexican modernism cannot be reduced to such “material” definitions. In the highly charged political context of Mexico in the first half of the 20th Century, modern architecture was perhaps above all else, a tool for propaganda.

          In this political atmosphere it was undesirable, indeed it was seen as impossible, to separate art, architecture and politics in a way that would be a direct reflection of Modern architecture’s European manifestations. Form was to follow function, but that function was to be communicative as well as spatial and programmatic. One consequence of this “political communicative function” in Mexico was the combination of the “mural tradition” with contemporary architectural design; what Zevi defined as “Mexican Grotesque”. In this paper, we will examine the political context of Post-Revolutionary Mexico and discuss what may be defined as its most iconic building; the Central Library at the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico. In direct counterpoint to Zevi, we will suggest that it was far from grotesque, but rather was one of the most committed political statements made by the Modern Movement throughout the Twentieth Century. It was propaganda, it was political. It was utopian.

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          Most cited references 12

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          “Interpretaciones Singulares de Visiones Colectivas: Estridentópolis.”

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            “Bibliografía Analítica.”

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              “Repaso para Mirar la Exposición del Surrealismo.”

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Amps
                Architecture_MPS
                UCL Press
                2050-9006
                November 2012
                : 1
                : 1
                Affiliations
                Faculty of Architecture, University of Veracruz, Mexico
                Article
                10.14324/111.444.amps.2012v1i3.001
                Copyright © 2012 The Author(s)

                This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic. To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

                Page count
                Figures: 5, Tables: 0, Equations: 0, References: 25, Pages: 19

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                Architecture_MPS
                Volume 1, Issue 1

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