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      The relationship between just world belief and wellbeing, cheating behaviors, and academic work behaviors during COVID 19 among university students

      research-article
      Scientific Reports
      Nature Publishing Group UK
      Health care, Human behaviour

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          Abstract

          Is the belief in a just world among students also stable under COVID-19? To answer this question, a study was conducted with university students from Germany (n = 291). The aim of the study was to analyze the predictive performance of the personal belief in a just world (PBJW) on students' life satisfaction and academic cheating and to take into account important mediators from the university context such as fellow student justice, lecturer justice, and procrastination. Derived from existing research, university students with a stronger PBJW should be more satisfied with their lives and cheat less than those with a weaker PBJW. The results support the hypothesized direct effects of PBJW on life satisfaction. Procrastination additionally mediated the effect of PBJW on life satisfaction. The level of PBJW predicted academic cheating only indirectly. The mediators procrastination and lecturer justice were crucial here. The results persisted when gender, learning, time to exam, socially desirable responding, general BJW, and self-efficacy were controlled. The findings were discussed in relation to the stressful situation caused by COVID-19. A reflection on the adaptive function of PBJW as a resource and relevant situation-specific mediators for university research and practice followed.

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          Most cited references131

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          Self-efficacy: Toward a unifying theory of behavioral change.

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            Subjective well-being.

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              The nature of procrastination: a meta-analytic and theoretical review of quintessential self-regulatory failure.

              Procrastination is a prevalent and pernicious form of self-regulatory failure that is not entirely understood. Hence, the relevant conceptual, theoretical, and empirical work is reviewed, drawing upon correlational, experimental, and qualitative findings. A meta-analysis of procrastination's possible causes and effects, based on 691 correlations, reveals that neuroticism, rebelliousness, and sensation seeking show only a weak connection. Strong and consistent predictors of procrastination were task aversiveness, task delay, self-efficacy, and impulsiveness, as well as conscientiousness and its facets of self-control, distractibility, organization, and achievement motivation. These effects prove consistent with temporal motivation theory, an integrative hybrid of expectancy theory and hyperbolic discounting. Continued research into procrastination should not be delayed, especially because its prevalence appears to be growing. (c) 2007 APA, all rights reserved.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                susan.muenscher@uni-koeln.de
                Journal
                Sci Rep
                Sci Rep
                Scientific Reports
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2045-2322
                22 August 2022
                22 August 2022
                2022
                : 12
                : 14328
                Affiliations
                GRID grid.6190.e, ISNI 0000 0000 8580 3777, Department of Psychology, , University of Cologne, ; Gronewaldstrasse 2, 50935 Cologne, Germany
                Author information
                http://orcid.org/0000-0003-0049-8630
                Article
                18045
                10.1038/s41598-022-18045-7
                9395426
                01db5817-4472-4dd4-8484-9172eee87045
                © The Author(s) 2022

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                History
                : 26 January 2022
                : 4 August 2022
                Funding
                Funded by: Universität zu Köln (1017)
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                © The Author(s) 2022

                Uncategorized
                health care,human behaviour
                Uncategorized
                health care, human behaviour

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