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      Latinx Undergraduates’ Navigation in the Context of COVID-19 and Racial Injustice

      1 , 2
      The Counseling Psychologist
      SAGE Publications

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          Abstract

          Six self-identified, first-generation, Latinx, undergraduates from West Coast public institutions were recruited via social media to participate in individual, semi-structured, qualitative interviews about their experiences with COVID-19 and racial injustice during the summer and fall of 2020. Interviews explored challenges and meaning-making around what was happening in participants’ lives during the COVID-19 pandemic and how they experienced and made sense of those events. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was used to identify emergent themes that fell into two main categories: (a) Adversities and (b) Ways of Overcoming. Several subthemes also emerged and are discussed for each category, including various ways of facing adversity, such as reliance on family and friends. Results highlight the need for expanded resources for first-generation Latinx undergraduate students. Limitations and future directions, as well as implications for counseling psychology researchers, educators, and practitioners are discussed.

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          Most cited references51

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          Structural racism and health inequities in the USA: evidence and interventions

          The Lancet, 389(10077), 1453-1463
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            Making sense of the meaning literature: an integrative review of meaning making and its effects on adjustment to stressful life events.

            Interest in meaning and meaning making in the context of stressful life events continues to grow, but research is hampered by conceptual and methodological limitations. Drawing on current theories, the author first presents an integrated model of meaning making. This model distinguishes between the constructs of global and situational meaning and between "meaning-making efforts" and "meaning made," and it elaborates subconstructs within these constructs. Using this model, the author reviews the empirical research regarding meaning in the context of adjustment to stressful events, outlining what has been established to date and evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of current empirical work. Results suggest that theory on meaning and meaning making has developed apace, but empirical research has failed to keep up with these developments, creating a significant gap between the rich but abstract theories and empirical tests of them. Given current empirical findings, some aspects of the meaning-making model appear to be well supported but others are not, and the quality of meaning-making efforts and meanings made may be at least as important as their quantity. This article concludes with specific suggestions for future research.
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              Consensual qualitative research: An update.

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                (View ORCID Profile)
                Journal
                The Counseling Psychologist
                The Counseling Psychologist
                SAGE Publications
                0011-0000
                1552-3861
                April 2022
                February 28 2022
                April 2022
                : 50
                : 3
                : 415-444
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Counseling, Clinical and School Psychology, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, USA
                [2 ]Carol Ackerman Positive Psychology Clinic, Counseling, Clinical, and School Psychology, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA, USA
                Article
                10.1177/00110000211072199
                05934be8-7f45-4a93-8d56-44cde4b537e2
                © 2022

                http://journals.sagepub.com/page/policies/text-and-data-mining-license

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