3
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Population genomics studies identify signatures of global dispersal and drug resistance in Plasmodium vivax.

      1 , 1 , 2 , 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 4 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 , 8 , 9 , 9 , 9 , 9 , 9 , 10 , 11 , 12 , 13 , 14 , 13 , 14 , 15 , 16 , 17 , 17 , 18 , 19 , 20 , 21 , 20 , 22 , 23 , 24 , 22 , 23 , 25 , 26 , 2 , 2 , 1

      Nature genetics

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Plasmodium vivax is a major public health burden, responsible for the majority of malaria infections outside Africa. We explored the impact of demographic history and selective pressures on the P. vivax genome by sequencing 182 clinical isolates sampled from 11 countries across the globe, using hybrid selection to overcome human DNA contamination. We confirmed previous reports of high genomic diversity in P. vivax relative to the more virulent Plasmodium falciparum species; regional populations of P. vivax exhibited greater diversity than the global P. falciparum population, indicating a large and/or stable population. Signals of natural selection suggest that P. vivax is evolving in response to antimalarial drugs and is adapting to regional differences in the human host and the mosquito vector. These findings underline the variable epidemiology of this parasite species and highlight the breadth of approaches that may be required to eliminate P. vivax globally.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          Nat. Genet.
          Nature genetics
          1546-1718
          1061-4036
          Aug 2016
          : 48
          : 8
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Center for Genomics and Systems Biology, Department of Biology, New York University, New York, New York, USA.
          [2 ] Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.
          [3 ] Institute for Genomics and Evolutionary Medicine, Department of Biology, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.
          [4 ] Caucaseco Scientific Research Center, Cali, Colombia.
          [5 ] Faculty of Health, Universidad del Valle, Cali, Colombia.
          [6 ] Dalian Institute of Biotechnology, Dalian, Liaoning, China.
          [7 ] Third Military Medical University, Shapingba, Chongqing, China.
          [8 ] Department of Entomology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA.
          [9 ] US Naval Medical Research Unit No. 6, Callao, Peru.
          [10 ] Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research, Madang, Papua, New Guinea.
          [11 ] Vector Borne Diseases Unit, Papua New Guinea Institute of Medical Research, Goroka, Papua New Guinea.
          [12 ] Division of Infection and Immunity, Walter &Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Parkville, Australia.
          [13 ] Division of Population Health and Immunity, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
          [14 ] Department of Medical Biology, University of Melbourne, Carlton, Victoria, Australia.
          [15 ] Institute of Global Health (ISGLOBAL), Barcelona, Spain.
          [16 ] Center for Global Health and Diseases, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA.
          [17 ] National Institute of Malaria Research Field Unit, Indian Council of Medical Research, National Institute of Epidemiology Campus, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.
          [18 ] National Institute of Malaria Research, Indian Council of Medical Research, New Delhi, India.
          [19 ] Department of Parasitology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil.
          [20 ] Mahidol Vivax Research Unit, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.
          [21 ] Department of Molecular Tropical Medicine and Genetics, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.
          [22 ] Instituto de Medicine Tropical Alexander von Humboldt, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru.
          [23 ] Departamento de Ciencias Celulares y Moleculares, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Peru.
          [24 ] Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.
          [25 ] Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California, USA.
          [26 ] Regional Centre for Research in Public Health, National Institute for Public Health, Tapachula, Chiapas, México.
          Article
          ng.3588
          10.1038/ng.3588
          27348298

          Comments

          Malaria vaccine development collection topic 5) Identifying and developing the new generation of malaria vaccines - Making use of reverse vaccinology and serology information:

          See https://www.scienceopen.com/collection/malariavaccine

          This study sequenced 182 clinical isolates sampled from 11 countries across the globe, exploring P. vivax genomic diversity, regional populations and signals of natural selection.

          2018-10-08 17:27 UTC
          +1

          Comment on this article