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      The Structure of the Nuclear Pore Complex (An Update)

      1 , 1
      Annual Review of Biochemistry
      Annual Reviews

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          Abstract

          The nuclear pore complex (NPC) serves as the sole bidirectional gateway of macromolecules in and out of the nucleus. Owing to its size and complexity (∼1,000 protein subunits, ∼110 MDa in humans), the NPC has remained one of the foremost challenges for structure determination. Structural studies have now provided atomic-resolution crystal structures of most nucleoporins. The acquisition of these structures, combined with biochemical reconstitution experiments, cross-linking mass spectrometry, and cryo–electron tomography, has facilitated the determination of the near-atomic overall architecture of the symmetric core of the human, fungal, and algal NPCs. Here, we discuss the insights gained from these new advances and outstanding issues regarding NPC structure and function. The powerful combination of bottom-up and top-down approaches toward determining the structure of the NPC offers a paradigm for uncovering the architectures of other complex biological machines to near-atomic resolution.

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          Most cited references231

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          The molecular architecture of the nuclear pore complex.

          Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are proteinaceous assemblies of approximately 50 MDa that selectively transport cargoes across the nuclear envelope. To determine the molecular architecture of the yeast NPC, we collected a diverse set of biophysical and proteomic data, and developed a method for using these data to localize the NPC's 456 constituent proteins (see the accompanying paper). Our structure reveals that half of the NPC is made up of a core scaffold, which is structurally analogous to vesicle-coating complexes. This scaffold forms an interlaced network that coats the entire curved surface of the nuclear envelope membrane within which the NPC is embedded. The selective barrier for transport is formed by large numbers of proteins with disordered regions that line the inner face of the scaffold. The NPC consists of only a few structural modules that resemble each other in terms of the configuration of their homologous constituents, the most striking of these being a 16-fold repetition of 'columns'. These findings provide clues to the evolutionary origins of the NPC.
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            A small ubiquitin-related polypeptide involved in targeting RanGAP1 to nuclear pore complex protein RanBP2.

            We have found that the mammalian Ran GTPase-activating protein RanGAP1 is highly concentrated at the cytoplasmic periphery of the nuclear pore complex (NPC), where it associates with the 358-kDa Ran-GTP-binding protein RanBP2. This interaction requires the ATP-dependent posttranslational conjugation of RanGAP1 with SUMO-1 (for small ubiquitin-related modifier), a novel protein of 101 amino acids that contains low but significant homology to ubiquitin. SUMO-1 appears to represent the prototype for a novel family of ubiquitin-related protein modifiers. Inhibition of nuclear protein import resulting from antibodies directed at NPC-associated RanGAP1 cannot be overcome by soluble cytosolic RanGAP1, indicating that GTP hydrolysis by Ran at RanBP2 is required for nuclear protein import.
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              Identification of long-lived proteins reveals exceptional stability of essential cellular structures.

              Intracellular proteins with long lifespans have recently been linked to age-dependent defects, ranging from decreased fertility to the functional decline of neurons. Why long-lived proteins exist in metabolically active cellular environments and how they are maintained over time remains poorly understood. Here, we provide a system-wide identification of proteins with exceptional lifespans in the rat brain. These proteins are inefficiently replenished despite being translated robustly throughout adulthood. Using nucleoporins as a paradigm for long-term protein persistence, we found that nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) are maintained over a cell's life through slow but finite exchange of even its most stable subcomplexes. This maintenance is limited, however, as some nucleoporin levels decrease during aging, providing a rationale for the previously observed age-dependent deterioration of NPC function. Our identification of a long-lived proteome reveals cellular components that are at increased risk for damage accumulation, linking long-term protein persistence to the cellular aging process. PAPERCLIP: Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Annual Review of Biochemistry
                Annu. Rev. Biochem.
                Annual Reviews
                0066-4154
                1545-4509
                June 20 2019
                June 20 2019
                : 88
                : 1
                : 725-783
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA;
                Article
                10.1146/annurev-biochem-062917-011901
                6588426
                30883195
                0a2e9984-d4a4-4fdc-b4a7-f87bd488868f
                © 2019
                History

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