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      Taste and emotionality in rats selectively bred for high versus low saccharin intake

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      Animal Learning & Behavior

      Springer Nature America, Inc

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          Most cited references 41

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          The open-field test A critical review

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            Animal model of depression: pharmacological sensitivity of a hedonic deficit.

            A reduction in sucrose and saccharine consumption following chronic stress is reported for the rat. This deficit may be related to consummatory deficits seen in endogenous depression. To further examine this state pharmacologically, stressed rats were treated with the antidepressant imipramine. Despite a general absence of appetitive effects (or in some cases mild anorexia) imipramine significantly restored saccharine consumption in a variety of tests. The pharmacological similarity of the deficit to the changes accompanying affective disorders further supports the potential applicability of the chronic stress model.
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              Bitter taste of saccharin related to the genetic ability to taste the bitter substance 6-n-propylthiouracil.

               L Bartoshuk (1979)
              Bitter taste thresholds for 6-n-propylthiouracil are bimodally distributed, dividing subjects into tasters and nontasters. Their taste worlds differ with regard to the sweetness of sucrose and saccharin and to the bitterness of saccharin. These differences suggest that nontasters tend to perceive less bitterness in saccharin at concentrations used in beverages.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Animal Learning & Behavior
                Animal Learning & Behavior
                Springer Nature America, Inc
                0090-4996
                1532-5830
                March 1996
                March 1996
                : 24
                : 1
                : 105-115
                Article
                10.3758/BF03198958
                © 1996
                Product

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