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      Co-infection of Manduca sexta larvae with polydnavirus from Cotesia congregata increases susceptibility to fatal infection by Autographa californica M Nucleopolyhedrovirus

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      Journal of Insect Physiology

      Elsevier BV

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          Abstract

          We investigated pathogenesis of Autographa californica M Nucleopolyhedrovirus in the semipermissive host, Manduca sexta, using a lacZ recombinant virus (AcMNPV-hsp70/lacZ) to track the temporal progression of infection. Results from time course studies monitoring infections initiated orally in fourth instars demonstrated that primary infection of midgut columnar cells began at 3 h post inoculation (hpi). We observed secondary infections in midgut-associated tracheae as early as 9 hpi, showing that the early events of pathogenesis in M. sexta are similar to those of permissive noctuid larvae. In M. sexta, however, unlike in permissive hosts, hemocytes rapidly surrounded infected tracheal cells and formed capsules. Subsequently, baculovirus infections failed to spread and ultimately were cleared, suggesting that a cellular immune response had been triggered. To assess the effects of immunosuppression on baculovirus-induced disease, we compared the outcome of infections in immunocompetent hosts with those that were immunocompromised either by parasitization with the braconid, Cotesia congregata, or by injection of the parasitoid's polydnavirus. During the first 9 days after inoculation, parasitized and polydnavirus-inoculated M. sexta larvae died more quickly and at higher levels than nonparasitized and sham-injected controls, suggesting that the cellular immune response was a factor in conferring resistance to fatal infection by AcMNPV-hsp70/lacZ.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Journal of Insect Physiology
          Journal of Insect Physiology
          Elsevier BV
          00221910
          February 2000
          February 2000
          : 46
          : 2
          : 179-190
          Article
          10.1016/S0022-1910(99)00115-8
          12770250
          1743bec4-5a2a-4de2-b4a4-aed557caaa2d
          © 2000

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