8
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Dating and Hooking Up in College: Meeting Contexts, Sex, and Variation by Gender, Partner's Gender, and Class Standing

      ,
      The Journal of Sex Research
      Informa UK Limited

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references26

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          No strings attached: The nature of casual sex in college students

          The purpose of this paper was to identify the circumstances associated with casual sex encounters, as well as to identify the link between casual sex, depressive symptoms, and infidelity among college students. We found that casual sex was a fairly common occurrence that was related to early sexual transition, engaging in first sex with a casual sex partner, drug use and alcohol consumption. Casual sex occurred more often between "friends" rather than with strangers. Depressive symptoms were associated with engaging in casual sex differently for males and females. Males who engaging in casual sex reported the fewest symptoms of depression and females who had a history of casual sex reported the most depressive symptoms. Frequencies of affectionate and genital behaviors were associated with expectations of the relationship, the relationship to the partner, infidelity, and the individual's relationship style. Results are discussed in light of evolutionary and socio-cultural theories of sexuality.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Accounting for Women's Orgasm and Sexual Enjoyment in College Hookups and Relationships

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Sexual hookup culture: A review.

              “Hookups,” or uncommitted sexual encounters, are becoming progressively more engrained in popular culture, reflecting both evolved sexual predilections and changing social and sexual scripts. Hook-up activities may include a wide range of sexual behaviors, such as kissing, oral sex, and penetrative intercourse. However, these encounters often transpire without any promise of, or desire for, a more traditional romantic relationship. A review of the literature suggests that these encounters are becoming increasingly normative among adolescents and young adults in North America, representing a marked shift in openness and acceptance of uncommitted sex. We reviewed the current literature on sexual hookups and considered the multiple forces influencing hookup culture, using examples from popular culture to place hooking up in context. We argue that contemporary hookup culture is best understood as the convergence of evolutionary and social forces during the developmental period of emerging adulthood. We suggest that researchers must consider both evolutionary mechanisms and social processes, and be considerate of the contemporary popular cultural climate in which hookups occur, in order to provide a comprehensive and synergistic biopsychosocial view of “casual sex” among emerging adults today.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                The Journal of Sex Research
                The Journal of Sex Research
                Informa UK Limited
                0022-4499
                1559-8519
                July 29 2014
                April 21 2014
                : 52
                : 5
                : 517-531
                Article
                10.1080/00224499.2014.901284
                24750129
                175e3d0c-9019-4a9f-927f-882dba7f24ff
                © 2014
                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article