Blog
About

91
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    1
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Psoriasis.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 94

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Plasmacytoid dendritic cells sense self-DNA coupled with antimicrobial peptide.

          Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) sense viral and microbial DNA through endosomal Toll-like receptors to produce type 1 interferons. pDCs do not normally respond to self-DNA, but this restriction seems to break down in human autoimmune disease by an as yet poorly understood mechanism. Here we identify the antimicrobial peptide LL37 (also known as CAMP) as the key factor that mediates pDC activation in psoriasis, a common autoimmune disease of the skin. LL37 converts inert self-DNA into a potent trigger of interferon production by binding the DNA to form aggregated and condensed structures that are delivered to and retained within early endocytic compartments in pDCs to trigger Toll-like receptor 9. Thus, our data uncover a fundamental role of an endogenous antimicrobial peptide in breaking innate tolerance to self-DNA and suggest that this pathway may drive autoimmunity in psoriasis.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Interleukin-22, a T(H)17 cytokine, mediates IL-23-induced dermal inflammation and acanthosis.

            Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by hyperplasia of the epidermis (acanthosis), infiltration of leukocytes into both the dermis and epidermis, and dilation and growth of blood vessels. The underlying cause of the epidermal acanthosis in psoriasis is still largely unknown. Recently, interleukin (IL)-23, a cytokine involved in the development of IL-17-producing T helper cells (T(H)17 cells), was found to have a potential function in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. Here we show that IL-22 is preferentially produced by T(H)17 cells and mediates the acanthosis induced by IL-23. We found that IL-23 or IL-6 can directly induce the production of IL-22 from both murine and human naive T cells. However, the production of IL-22 and IL-17 from T(H)17 cells is differentially regulated. Transforming growth factor-beta, although crucial for IL-17 production, actually inhibits IL-22 production. Furthermore, IL-22 mediates IL-23-induced acanthosis and dermal inflammation through the activation of Stat3 (signal transduction and activators of transcription 3) in vivo. Our results suggest that T(H)17 cells, through the production of both IL-22 and IL-17, might have essential functions in host defence and in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases such as psoriasis. IL-22, as an effector cytokine produced by T cells, mediates the crosstalk between the immune system and epithelial cells.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Genomewide Scan Reveals Association of Psoriasis with IL-23 and NF-κB Pathways

              Psoriasis is a common immune mediated disorder that affects the skin, nails, and joints. To identify psoriasis susceptibility loci, we genotyped 438,670 SNPs in 1,409 European ancestry psoriasis cases and 1,436 controls. Twenty-one promising SNPs were followed-up in 5,048 psoriasis cases and 5,041 controls. Our results provide strong support for the association of at least seven genetic loci and psoriasis (each with p < 5×10−8 overall). Loci with confirmed association encode HLA-C, three genes involved in IL-23 signaling (IL23A, IL23R, IL12B), two genes that act downstream of TNF-α and regulate NF-κB signaling (TNIP1, TNFAIP3), and two genes involved in the modulation of Th2 immune responses (IL4, IL13). Although the proteins encoded in these loci are known to interact biologically, we found no evidence for epistasis between associated SNPs. Our results expand the catalog of genetic loci implicated in psoriasis susceptibility and suggest priority targets for study in other auto-immune disorders.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                N. Engl. J. Med.
                The New England journal of medicine
                New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM/MMS)
                1533-4406
                0028-4793
                Jul 30 2009
                : 361
                : 5
                Affiliations
                [1 ] St. John's Institute of Dermatology, Federation of Clinical Immunology Societies Centre of Excellence at King's College London and Guy's and St. Thomas' Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom. frank.nestle@kcl.ac.uk
                361/5/496
                10.1056/NEJMra0804595
                19641206

                Comments

                Comment on this article