Blog
About

11
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      An evaluation of the impact of flooring types on exposures to fine and coarse particles within the residential micro-environment using CONTAM.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Typical resuspension activities within the home, such as walking, have been estimated to contribute up to 25% of personal exposures to PM10. Chamber studies have shown that for moderate walking intensities, flooring type can impact the rate at which particles are re-entrained into the air. For this study, the impact of residential flooring type on incremental average daily (24 h) time-averaged exposure was investigated. Distributions of incremental time-averaged daily exposures to fine and coarse PM while walking within the residential micro-environment were predicted using CONTAM, the multizone airflow and contaminant transport program of the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Knowledge of when and where a person was walking was determined by randomly selecting 490 daily diaries from the EPA's consolidated human activity database (CHAD). On the basis of the results of this study, residential flooring type can significantly impact incremental time-averaged daily exposures to coarse and fine particles (α=0.05, P<0.05, N=490, Kruskal-Wallis test) with high-density cut pile carpeting resulting in the highest exposures. From this study, resuspension from walking within the residential micro-environment contributed 6-72% of time-averaged daily exposures to PM10.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          J Expo Sci Environ Epidemiol
          Journal of exposure science & environmental epidemiology
          Springer Nature
          1559-064X
          1559-0631
          May 15 2015
          : 26
          : 1
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Chemical, Biological and Agricultural Engineering, University of Technology, Kingston, Jamaica.
          [2 ] Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Clarkson University, Potsdam, New York, USA.
          [3 ] Dakota Consulting, Silver Spring, Maryland, USA.
          [4 ] Department of Mathematics, Clarkson University, Potsdam, New York, USA.
          jes201531
          10.1038/jes.2015.31
          25967067

          Comments

          Comment on this article