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      Rat brains also have a default mode network.

      Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America

      Animals, Behavior, Animal, Brain, metabolism, pathology, physiology, Brain Mapping, methods, Haplorhini, Humans, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Models, Anatomic, Models, Biological, Neural Pathways, Rats, Species Specificity

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          Abstract

          The default mode network (DMN) in humans has been suggested to support a variety of cognitive functions and has been implicated in an array of neuropsychological disorders. However, its function(s) remains poorly understood. We show that rats possess a DMN that is broadly similar to the DMNs of nonhuman primates and humans. Our data suggest that, despite the distinct evolutionary paths between rodent and primate brain, a well-organized, intrinsically coherent DMN appears to be a fundamental feature in the mammalian brain whose primary functions might be to integrate multimodal sensory and affective information to guide behavior in anticipation of changing environmental contingencies.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          22355129
          3309754
          10.1073/pnas.1200506109

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