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      Early efficacy of budesonide/formoterol in patients with moderate-to-very-severe COPD

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          Abstract

          Background and objective

          Large clinical trials have confirmed the long-term efficacy of inhaled corticosteroid/long-acting β 2-agonist combinations in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). It was hypothesized that significant treatment effects would already be present within 3 months after the initiation of treatment across a range of clinical outcomes, irrespective of COPD severity.

          Methods

          Post hoc analysis of 3-month post-randomization outcomes, including exacerbation rates, dropouts, symptoms, reliever use, and lung function, from three studies with similar inclusion criteria of moderate-to-very-severe COPD. Patients (n=1,571) were treated with budesonide/formoterol (B/F) 320/9 μg or placebo, twice daily; in one study, tiotropium 18 μg once daily was also given.

          Results

          Over the first 3 months of treatment, fewer patients randomized to B/F experienced exacerbations versus the placebo group (111 and 196 patients with ≥1 exacerbation, respectively). This was true in each COPD severity group. Compared with placebo, B/F treatment led to significantly lower 3-month exacerbation rates in the moderate and severe COPD severity groups (46% and 57% reduction, respectively), with a nonsignificant reduction (29%) in very severe COPD. Fewer dropouts occurred among patients treated with B/F versus placebo, this effect being greater with increasing COPD severity. B/F was associated with improved forced expiratory volume in 1 s, morning peak expiratory flow rate, total reliever use, and total symptom score versus placebo.

          Conclusion

          Treatment with B/F decreased exacerbations in patients with moderate-to-very-severe COPD within 3 months of commencing treatment. This effect was paralleled by improved lung function, less reliever medication use, and fewer symptoms, irrespective of disease severity.

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          Most cited references 15

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          Maintenance therapy with budesonide and formoterol in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

          Lung function in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can be improved acutely by oral corticosteroids and bronchodilators. Whether clinical improvement can be maintained by subsequent inhaled therapy is unknown. COPD patients (n=1,022, mean prebronchodilator forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) 36% predicted) initially received formoterol (9 microg b.i.d.) and oral prednisolone (30 mg o.d.) for 2 weeks. After this time, patients were randomised to b.i.d. inhaled budesonide/formoterol 320/9 microg, budesonide 400 microg, formoterol 9 microg or placebo for 12 months. Postmedication FEV1 improved by 0.21 L and health-related quality of life using the St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ) by 4.5 units after run-in. Fewer patients receiving budesonide/formoterol withdrew from the study than those receiving budesonide, formoterol or placebo. Budesonide/formoterol patients had a prolonged time to first exacerbation (254 versus 96 days) and maintained higher FEV1 (99% versus 87% of baseline), both primary variables versus placebo. They had fewer exacerbations (1.38 versus 1.80 exacerbations per patient per year), had higher prebronchodilator peak expiratory flow, and showed clinically relevant improvements in SGRQ versus placebo (-7.5 units). Budesonide/formoterol was more effective than either monocomponent in both primary variables. Budesonide/formoterol in a single inhaler (Symbicort) maintains the benefit of treatment optimisation, stabilising lung function and delaying exacerbations more effectively than either component drug alone or placebo.
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            Efficacy and safety of budesonide/formoterol in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

            The efficacy and safety of budesonide/formoterol in a single inhaler compared with placebo, budesonide and formoterol were evaluated in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In a 12-month, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group study in 812 adults (mean age 64 yrs, mean forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) 36% predicted normal), patients received two inhalations twice daily of either budesonide/formoterol (Symbicort) 160/4.5 microg (delivered dose), budesonide 200 microg (metered dose), formoterol 4.5 microg or placebo. Severe exacerbations and FEV1 (primary variables), peak expiratory flow (PEF), COPD symptoms, health-related quality of life (HRQL), mild exacerbations, use of reliever beta2-agonist and safety variables were recorded. Budesonide/formoterol reduced the mean number of severe exacerbations per patient per year by 24% versus placebo and 23% versus formoterol. FEV1 increased by 15% versus placebo and 9% versus budesonide. Morning PEF improved significantly on day 1 versus placebo and budesonide; after 1 week, morning PEF was improved versus placebo, budesonide and formoterol. Improvements in morning and evening PEF versus comparators were maintained over 12 months. Budesonide/formoterol decreased all symptom scores and use of reliever beta2-agonists significantly versus placebo and budesonide, and improved HRQL versus placebo. All treatments were well tolerated. These results suggest a role for budesonide/formoterol in the long-term management of moderate-to-severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
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              Tiotropium Respimat inhaler and the risk of death in COPD.

              Tiotropium delivered at a dose of 5 μg with the Respimat inhaler showed efficacy similar to that of 18 μg of tiotropium delivered with the HandiHaler inhalation device in placebo-controlled trials involving patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although tiotropium HandiHaler was associated with reduced mortality, as compared with placebo, more deaths were reported with tiotropium Respimat than with placebo.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis
                International Journal of COPD
                International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
                Dove Medical Press
                1176-9106
                1178-2005
                2017
                19 December 2016
                : 12
                : 13-25
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Pulmonary and Rehabilitation Research Group, University Hospital Aintree, Liverpool, UK
                [2 ]Department of Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, University Hospital, Lund, Sweden
                [3 ]George Institute for Global Health, The University of Sydney and Concord Clinical School, Sydney, Australia
                [4 ]Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Allergology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center and South Texas Veterans’ Health Care System, San Antonio, Texas
                [5 ]Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine, National Jewish Health, University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado, USA
                [6 ]AstraZeneca R&D, Gothenburg, Sweden
                [7 ]Department of Pulmonary Medicine and Tuberculosis, GRIAC Research Institute, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, the Netherlands
                Author notes
                Correspondence: Peter M Calverley, Department of Clinical Sciences, Institute of Aging and Chronic Disease, University Hospital Aintree, Lower Lane, Liverpool L9 7AL, UK, Tel +44 151 529 5886, Fax +44 151 529 5888, Email pmcal@ 123456liverpool.ac.uk
                Article
                copd-12-013
                10.2147/COPD.S114209
                5182036
                © 2017 Calverley et al. This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited

                The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/). By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed.

                Categories
                Original Research

                Respiratory medicine

                bronchodilator agents, clinical respiratory medicine, clinical trials, copd

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