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      THE CARE AND FEEDING OF A LONG-TERM INSTITUTIONAL COMMITMENT TO GREEN STORMWATER INFRASTRUCTURE: A CASE STUDY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT

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          INTRODUCTION

          In 2007, the Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection issued the first Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) in the country based not on a specific pollutant or pollutants, but on impervious cover (IC) (Arnold et al., 2010). The water body in question was Eagleville Brook, a small tributary of the Willimantic River in eastern Connecticut that drains a majority of the University of Connecticut campus. The university is in effect a small city within a largely rural area. Partly as a result of this, there has been a history of “town-gown” tension and controversy with regard to the university's impact on the water resources of the area. This tension reached a climax in September 2005, when a quarter-mile stretch of the Fenton River, which drains the part of campus not in the Eagleville watershed, ran dry (Merritt, 2005). Water quantity concerns were frequently joined by water quality concerns, with area residents complaining about the pollution of their drinking water (Morse, 2002).

          Although the Fenton incident precipitated increased efforts on the part of the university to conserve water, efforts to improve the way that campus addressed stormwater issues lagged behind until the advent of the impervious cover TMDL. In the intervening eight years since the issuance of the “IC-TMDL” - practically the wink of an eye in the deliberate world of land use decision making - the University of Connecticut campus has become a showcase for green stormwater infrastructure (GSI) practices, also known as low impact development (LID) practices.

          While the IC-TMDL served as the catalyst, an environmental regulation, no matter how innovative, cannot in itself produce such dramatic change. For this to occur a number of interconnected efforts have to come together, including leadership, research, monitoring, coordination, and education both within and without the university community. This paper is an attempt to capture these key elements, consider why they worked (or didn't), and provide a status report on green stormwater infrastructure on the University of Connecticut campus.

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          Effect of a modular extensive green roof on stormwater runoff and water quality

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            Responding to the first impervious cover-based TMDL in the nation

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              Hartford Courant, September 16, 2005

              G Merritt (2005)
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                jgrb
                Journal of Green Building
                College Publishing
                1552-6100
                1943-4618
                1943-4618
                Summer 2015
                : 10
                : 3
                : 1-13
                Author notes

                1. Michael Dietz, Ph.D. is an Associate Extension Educator in the Center for Land Use Education and Research at the University of Connecticut. He can be reached at 860-345-5225 or michael.dietz@ 123456uconn.edu .

                2. Chester Arnold is an Extension Educator in the Center for Land Use Education and Research at the University of Connecticut.

                3. Katie Milardo is an Environmental Compliance Analyst in the Office of Environmental Policy at the University of Connecticut.

                4. Richard Miller Esq. is the Director of the Office of Environmental Policy at the University of Connecticut.

                Article
                jgb.10.3.1
                10.3992/jgb.10.3.1
                232a332e-25e9-4215-95cf-e9647b01d9c2
                ©2015 by College Publishing. All rights reserved.

                Volumes 1-10 of JOGB are open access and do not require permission for use, though proper citation should be given. To view the licenses, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

                History
                Page count
                Pages: 13
                Categories
                INDUSTRY CORNER

                Urban design & Planning,Civil engineering,Environmental management, Policy & Planning,Architecture,Environmental engineering
                university,low impact development,green stormwater infrastructure

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