7
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Effective size of an Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) metapopulation in Northern Spain

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisher
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Related collections

          Most cited references22

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Book: not found

          Molecular Markers, Natural History and Evolution

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Genetic assignment methods for the direct, real-time estimation of migration rate: a simulation-based exploration of accuracy and power.

            Genetic assignment methods use genotype likelihoods to draw inference about where individuals were or were not born, potentially allowing direct, real-time estimates of dispersal. We used simulated data sets to test the power and accuracy of Monte Carlo resampling methods in generating statistical thresholds for identifying F0 immigrants in populations with ongoing gene flow, and hence for providing direct, real-time estimates of migration rates. The identification of accurate critical values required that resampling methods preserved the linkage disequilibrium deriving from recent generations of immigrants and reflected the sampling variance present in the data set being analysed. A novel Monte Carlo resampling method taking into account these aspects was proposed and its efficiency was evaluated. Power and error were relatively insensitive to the frequency assumed for missing alleles. Power to identify F0 immigrants was improved by using large sample size (up to about 50 individuals) and by sampling all populations from which migrants may have originated. A combination of plotting genotype likelihoods and calculating mean genotype likelihood ratios (DLR) appeared to be an effective way to predict whether F0 immigrants could be identified for a particular pair of populations using a given set of markers.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Genetic estimates of contemporary effective population size: what can they tell us about the importance of genetic stochasticity for wild population persistence?

              Genetic stochasticity due to small population size contributes to population extinction, especially when population fragmentation disrupts gene flow. Estimates of effective population size (Ne) can therefore be informative about population persistence, but there is a need for an assessment of their consistency and informative relevance. Here we review the body of empirical estimates of Ne for wild populations obtained with the temporal genetic method and published since Frankham's (1995) review. Theoretical considerations have identified important sources of bias for this analytical approach, and we use empirical data to investigate the extent of these biases. We find that particularly model selection and sampling require more attention in future studies. We report a median unbiased Ne estimate of 260 (among 83 studies) and find that this median estimate tends to be smaller for populations of conservation concern, which may therefore be more sensitive to genetic stochasticity. Furthermore, we report a median Ne/N ratio of 0.14, and find that this ratio may actually be higher for small populations, suggesting changes in biological interactions at low population abundances. We confirm the role of gene flow in countering genetic stochasticity by finding that Ne correlates strongest with neutral genetic metrics when populations can be considered isolated. This underlines the importance of gene flow for the estimation of Ne, and of population connectivity for conservation in general. Reductions in contemporary gene flow due to ongoing habitat fragmentation will likely increase the prevalence of genetic stochasticity, which should therefore remain a focal point in the conservation of biodiversity.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Conservation Genetics
                Conserv Genet
                Springer Nature
                1566-0621
                1572-9737
                June 2010
                June 2 2009
                June 2010
                : 11
                : 4
                : 1559-1565
                Article
                10.1007/s10592-009-9945-6
                24dfdcb1-46ba-4ce3-bf59-150ac94eaaff
                © 2010
                History

                Comments

                Comment on this article