7
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      Oxytocin mediated behavior in invertebrates: An evolutionary perspective.

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The molecular and functional conservation of oxytocin-related neuropeptides in behavior is striking. In animals separated by at least 600 million years of evolution, from roundworms to humans, oxytocin homologs play critical roles in the modulation of reproductive behavior and other biological functions. Here, we review the roles of oxytocin in invertebrate behavior from an evolutionary perspective. We begin by tracing the evolution of oxytocin through the invertebrate animal lineages, and then describe common themes in invertebrate behaviors that are mediated by oxytocin-related peptides, including reproductive behavior, learning and memory, food arousal, and predator/prey relationships. Finally, we discuss interesting future directions that have recently become experimentally tractable. Studying oxytocin in invertebrates offers precise insights into the activity of neuropeptides on well-defined neural circuits; the principles that emerge may also be represented in the more complex vertebrate brain. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 77: 128-142, 2017.

          Related collections

          Author and article information

          Journal
          Dev Neurobiol
          Developmental neurobiology
          Wiley-Blackwell
          1932-846X
          1932-8451
          February 2017
          : 77
          : 2
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Laboratory of Neural Circuits and Behavior, The Rockefeller University, New York, New York, 10065.
          [2 ] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Rockefeller University, New York, New York, 10065.
          Article
          10.1002/dneu.22466
          27804275

          behavior, evolution, neuromodulation, neuropeptides, oxytocin

          Comments

          Comment on this article