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      Psychology as a site for decolonial analysis

      Readsura Decolonial Editorial Collective
      Journal of Social Issues
      Wiley

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          Culture and the self: Implications for cognition, emotion, and motivation.

          Psychological Review, 98(2), 224-253
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            PSYCHOLOGY. Estimating the reproducibility of psychological science.

            Reproducibility is a defining feature of science, but the extent to which it characterizes current research is unknown. We conducted replications of 100 experimental and correlational studies published in three psychology journals using high-powered designs and original materials when available. Replication effects were half the magnitude of original effects, representing a substantial decline. Ninety-seven percent of original studies had statistically significant results. Thirty-six percent of replications had statistically significant results; 47% of original effect sizes were in the 95% confidence interval of the replication effect size; 39% of effects were subjectively rated to have replicated the original result; and if no bias in original results is assumed, combining original and replication results left 68% with statistically significant effects. Correlational tests suggest that replication success was better predicted by the strength of original evidence than by characteristics of the original and replication teams.
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              False-positive psychology: undisclosed flexibility in data collection and analysis allows presenting anything as significant.

              In this article, we accomplish two things. First, we show that despite empirical psychologists' nominal endorsement of a low rate of false-positive findings (≤ .05), flexibility in data collection, analysis, and reporting dramatically increases actual false-positive rates. In many cases, a researcher is more likely to falsely find evidence that an effect exists than to correctly find evidence that it does not. We present computer simulations and a pair of actual experiments that demonstrate how unacceptably easy it is to accumulate (and report) statistically significant evidence for a false hypothesis. Second, we suggest a simple, low-cost, and straightforwardly effective disclosure-based solution to this problem. The solution involves six concrete requirements for authors and four guidelines for reviewers, all of which impose a minimal burden on the publication process.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Social Issues
                Journal of Social Issues
                Wiley
                0022-4537
                1540-4560
                June 2022
                June 28 2022
                June 2022
                : 78
                : 2
                : 255-277
                Article
                10.1111/josi.12524
                3eb02f7f-de80-4998-be66-7c694055c131
                © 2022

                http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/termsAndConditions#vor

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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