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      Psychological effects of the Covid-2019 pandemic: perceived stress and coping strategies among healthcare professionals

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          Highlights

          • During a sudden and unprecedented event, such as the current pandemic, healthcare workers may be inadequately prepared and supported to cope with stressors and this negatively affected working environment.

          • For healthcare professionals, a positive attitude towards the stressful situation was the main protective factor, while female gender, seeking social support, avoidance strategies and working with Covid-19 patients were risk factors.

          • It is important to investigate the response of healthcare professionals to the Covid-19 pandemic, in terms of perceived stress and coping strategies, in order to implement targeted prevention and intervention programs.

          Abstract

          Starting from China, the coronavirus disease (Covid-19) contagion spread unexpectedly and quickly all over the world, particularly affecting Italy. In the early stages of the epidemic, healthcare professionals have been in the front-line to manage the infection. The current study aimed to analyse the impact of Covid-19 outbreak on healthcare professionals and to detect some risk and protective factors of their distress levels, with regard to socio-demographic variables, direct exposure to Covid-19 and the coping strategies used to deal with stress. The data were collected during the peak of the infection. A total of 595 healthcare professionals enrolled in the study and completed the measures of socio-demographical and professional data, perceived stress (PPS) and coping strategies (COPE-NIV-25). Overall, we found that a positive attitude towards the stressful situation was the main protective factor, while female gender, seeking social support, avoidance strategies and working with Covid-19 patients were risk factors. Economic status, problem solving ability and turning to religion were not associated with stress levels. This study, one of the first on this topic, highlighted the main coping strategies used by healthcare professionals in facing the highly stressful situation caused by the pandemic.

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          Most cited references 33

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          Is Open Access

          Factors Associated With Mental Health Outcomes Among Health Care Workers Exposed to Coronavirus Disease 2019

          Key Points Question What factors are associated with mental health outcomes among health care workers in China who are treating patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)? Findings In this cross-sectional study of 1257 health care workers in 34 hospitals equipped with fever clinics or wards for patients with COVID-19 in multiple regions of China, a considerable proportion of health care workers reported experiencing symptoms of depression, anxiety, insomnia, and distress, especially women, nurses, those in Wuhan, and front-line health care workers directly engaged in diagnosing, treating, or providing nursing care to patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19. Meaning These findings suggest that, among Chinese health care workers exposed to COVID-19, women, nurses, those in Wuhan, and front-line health care workers have a high risk of developing unfavorable mental health outcomes and may need psychological support or interventions.
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            Gender differences in stress and coping styles

             M.Pilar Matud (2004)
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              Healthcare Workers Emotions, Perceived Stressors and Coping Strategies During a MERS-CoV Outbreak

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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                Psychiatry Res
                Psychiatry Res
                Psychiatry Research
                Published by Elsevier B.V.
                0165-1781
                1872-7123
                3 August 2020
                3 August 2020
                Affiliations
                Department of Psychological, Health and Territorial Sciences, University "G. d'Annunzio" of Chieti
                Author notes
                [* ]Corresponding Author: Carmen Trumello, Department of Psychological, Health and Territorial Sciences, University, “G. d'Annunzio” of Chieti, Via Dei Vestini – 66100 Chieti (Italy), Phone: +39 0871 3555892 c.trumello@ 123456unich.it
                Article
                S0165-1781(20)31375-5 113366
                10.1016/j.psychres.2020.113366
                7397939
                © 2020 Published by Elsevier B.V.

                Since January 2020 Elsevier has created a COVID-19 resource centre with free information in English and Mandarin on the novel coronavirus COVID-19. The COVID-19 resource centre is hosted on Elsevier Connect, the company's public news and information website. Elsevier hereby grants permission to make all its COVID-19-related research that is available on the COVID-19 resource centre - including this research content - immediately available in PubMed Central and other publicly funded repositories, such as the WHO COVID database with rights for unrestricted research re-use and analyses in any form or by any means with acknowledgement of the original source. These permissions are granted for free by Elsevier for as long as the COVID-19 resource centre remains active.

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