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      Prevalence, impacts and medical managements of premenstrual syndrome among female students: cross-sectional study in college of health sciences, Mekelle University, Mekelle, Northern Ethiopia

      research-article
      1 , 2 ,
      BMC Women's Health
      BioMed Central
      Prevalence, Impacts, Medical management, PMS, Female students

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          Abstract

          Background

          Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is used to describe physical, cognitive, affective, and behavioral symptoms that occur cyclically during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle and resolve quickly at or within a few days of the onset of menstruation. The primary aim of the study was to assess the prevalence, impacts and medical managements of PMS on female medical students of Mekelle University College of Health Sciences.

          Methods

          A cross-sectional study was conducted among systematically selected female students of Mekelle University College of Health Sciences, Mekelle town, northern Ethiopia from March to April 2013. A structured and pretested self-administered questionnaire was employed for data collection. The collected data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL (SPSS version 16). The criteria proposed by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition, text revision (DSM-IV TR) were used to diagnose PMS.

          Result

          From the total population size of 608; a sample size of 258 was drawn. Age of the study participants ranged from 18 to 25 years, with mean age of 20.86 ± 1.913 years. Among the participants, 144(83.2%) have had at least one PM symptoms with their menstrual period. The prevalence of PMS according to DSM-IV was 37.0%. About 49(28.3%) reported frequent class missing, 17(9.8%) exam missing, 14(8.1%) low grade scoring and 3(1.7%) of them reported withdrawal from their learning associated with their PMS. Only 83(48.0%) participants sought medical treatment for their PMS. The treatment modalities used were pain killers, 63(36.4%), hot drinks like coffee and tea, 13(7.5%), and massage therapy and exercise, 7(4.0%). Binary logistic regression analysis revealed average length of one cycle of menstruation (COR = 0.20(0.070-0.569) and academic performance impairment (AOR = 0.345(0.183-0.653) were significantly associated with the diagnosis of PMS and use of PMS treatments respectively.

          Conclusions

          Our study revealed a high prevalence and negative impact of PMS on students of Mekelle University. Therefore, health education, appropriate medical treatment and counseling services, as part of the overall health service, should be availed and provided to affected women.

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          Most cited references13

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          Premenstrual syndrome.

          Premenstrual syndrome, a common cyclic disorder of young and middle-aged women, is characterized by emotional and physical symptoms that consistently occur during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle. Women with more severe affective symptoms are classified as having premenstrual dysphoric disorder. Although the etiology of these disorders remains uncertain, research suggests that altered regulation of neurohormones and neurotransmitters is involved. Premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder are diagnoses of exclusion; therefore, alternative explanations for symptoms must be considered before either diagnosis is made. The disorders can manifest with a wide variety of symptoms, including depression, mood lability, abdominal pain, breast tenderness, headache, and fatigue. Women with mild symptoms should be instructed about lifestyle changes, including healthy diet, sodium and caffeine restriction, exercise, and stress reduction. Supportive strategies, such as use of a symptom diary, may be helpful in diagnosing and managing the disorders. In women with moderate symptoms, treatment includes both medication and lifestyle modifications. Dietary supplements, such as calcium and evening primrose oil, may offer modest benefit. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors such as fluoxetine and sertraline are the most effective pharmacologic agents. Prostaglandin inhibitors and diuretics may provide some relief of symptoms. Only weak evidence supports the effectiveness of gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists, androgenic agents, estrogen, progesterone, or other psychotropics, and side effects limit their use.
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            Factors associated with premenstrual syndrome - a survey of new female university students.

            Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) can impact an individual's interpersonal relationships, social interactions, productivity, lifestyle, school performance and emotional well-being. This study was designed to explore the factors associated with PMS in new female university students in Taiwan. The test battery included a self-administered structured questionnaire, the five-item brief symptoms rating scale, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Chinese Premenstrual Symptom Questionnaire. Additionally, details of the participants' lifestyles and family and personal histories of physical illness were recorded. Serum lipids were also measured. Of all the participants (N = 1699), 39.85% were defined as having PMS. Using logistical regression analysis, we found a positive relationship between PMS and consuming more foods containing egg yolk, greater alcohol intake, poorer sleep quality, higher likelihood of psychiatric morbidity, family history of dyslipidemia, and a higher serum cholesterol level. The results show that PMS is prevalent among new female university students and that lifestyle and nutritional/metabolic factors may play a role in this disorder. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.
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              The phenomenology of premenstrual syndrome in female medical students: a cross sectional study

              Background The premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is particularly common in the younger age groups and, therefore represents a significant public health problem in young girls. This study aims to estimate the prevalence, severity, determinants of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and its impact among the female medical students in Al-Ahsa, Saudi Arabia. Methods This study was performed at the College of Medicine, King Faisal University, Saudi Arabia, from June through December 2009. It included 250 medical students. They filled different questionnaires covering American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology (ACOG) criteria to diagnose PMS, demographic & reproductive factors, physical activity and mental condition. Regression analysis was conducted for all the predictors. Results PMS was diagnosed in 35.6% of cases, distributed as 45% mild, 32.6% moderate and 22.4% severe. There were significant trends for older age, rural residence, family income and family history of PMS. The dominant limited activity was concentration in class (48.3%). Limitations of activities were significantly more frequent among severe cases. The prevalence of anxiety and depression was statistically more evident in the PMS group. Regression analysis revealed that, PMS was significantly associated with older age groups, rural residence, lower age at menarche, regularity of menses and family history. Conclusion PMS is a common problem in young Saudi students in Al Ahsa. Severe PMS was associated with more impairment of daily activities and psychological distress symptoms. Older student age, rural residence, earlier age of menarche, regular cycles and positive family history are possible risk factors for PMS.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Journal
                BMC Womens Health
                BMC Womens Health
                BMC Women's Health
                BioMed Central
                1472-6874
                2014
                29 March 2014
                : 14
                : 52
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Dembidolo Hospital, Wellega, Western Ethiopia
                [2 ]College of Health Sciences and Medicine, Wolaita Sodo University, Wolaita Sodo, P.O.Box: 138, Southern Ethiopia
                Article
                1472-6874-14-52
                10.1186/1472-6874-14-52
                3994244
                24678964
                4b834f9a-e131-4b3f-9133-4af4c89e632f
                Copyright © 2014 Tolossa and Bekele; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

                History
                : 7 October 2013
                : 24 March 2014
                Categories
                Research Article

                Obstetrics & Gynecology
                prevalence,impacts,medical management,pms,female students
                Obstetrics & Gynecology
                prevalence, impacts, medical management, pms, female students

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