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      DADA2: High resolution sample inference from Illumina amplicon data

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          Abstract

          We present DADA2, a software package that models and corrects Illumina-sequenced amplicon errors. DADA2 infers sample sequences exactly, without coarse-graining into OTUs, and resolves differences of as little as one nucleotide. In several mock communities DADA2 identified more real variants and output fewer spurious sequences than other methods. We applied DADA2 to vaginal samples from a cohort of pregnant women, revealing a diversity of previously undetected Lactobacillus crispatus variants.

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          Most cited references 12

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          Rapid denoising of pyrosequencing amplicon data: exploiting the rank-abundance distribution

          We developed a fast method for denoising pyrosequencing for community 16S rRNA analysis. We observe a 2–4 fold reduction in the number of observed OTUs (operational taxonomic units) comparing denoised with non-denoised data. ~50,000 sequences can be denoised on a laptop within an hour, two orders of magnitude faster than published techniques. We demonstrate the effects of denoising on alpha and beta diversity of large 16S rRNA datasets.
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            Is Open Access

            Insight into biases and sequencing errors for amplicon sequencing with the Illumina MiSeq platform

            With read lengths of currently up to 2 × 300 bp, high throughput and low sequencing costs Illumina's MiSeq is becoming one of the most utilized sequencing platforms worldwide. The platform is manageable and affordable even for smaller labs. This enables quick turnaround on a broad range of applications such as targeted gene sequencing, metagenomics, small genome sequencing and clinical molecular diagnostics. However, Illumina error profiles are still poorly understood and programs are therefore not designed for the idiosyncrasies of Illumina data. A better knowledge of the error patterns is essential for sequence analysis and vital if we are to draw valid conclusions. Studying true genetic variation in a population sample is fundamental for understanding diseases, evolution and origin. We conducted a large study on the error patterns for the MiSeq based on 16S rRNA amplicon sequencing data. We tested state-of-the-art library preparation methods for amplicon sequencing and showed that the library preparation method and the choice of primers are the most significant sources of bias and cause distinct error patterns. Furthermore we tested the efficiency of various error correction strategies and identified quality trimming (Sickle) combined with error correction (BayesHammer) followed by read overlapping (PANDAseq) as the most successful approach, reducing substitution error rates on average by 93%.
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              Characterization of mutation spectra with ultra-deep pyrosequencing: application to HIV-1 drug resistance.

              The detection of mutant spectra within a population of microorganisms is critical for the management of drug-resistant infections. We performed ultra-deep pyrosequencing to detect minor sequence variants in HIV-1 protease and reverse transcriptase (RT) genes from clinical plasma samples. We estimated empirical error rates from four HIV-1 plasmid clones and used them to develop a statistical approach to distinguish authentic minor variants from sequencing errors in eight clinical samples. Ultra-deep pyrosequencing detected an average of 58 variants per sample compared with an average of eight variants per sample detected by conventional direct-PCR dideoxynucleotide sequencing. In the clinical sample with the largest number of minor sequence variants, all 60 variants present in > or =3% of genomes and 20 of 35 variants present in <3% of genomes were confirmed by limiting dilution sequencing. With appropriate analysis, ultra-deep pyrosequencing is a promising method for characterizing genetic diversity and detecting minor yet clinically relevant variants in biological samples with complex genetic populations.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                101215604
                32338
                Nat Methods
                Nat. Methods
                Nature methods
                1548-7091
                1548-7105
                1 May 2016
                23 May 2016
                July 2016
                23 November 2016
                : 13
                : 7
                : 581-583
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Statistics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
                [2 ]Second Genome, South San Francisco, CA, USA
                [3 ]Department of Applied Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA
                Author notes
                [* ]Corresponding Author: benjamin.j.callahan@ 123456gmail.com
                Article
                NIHMS782534
                10.1038/nmeth.3869
                4927377
                27214047

                Users may view, print, copy, and download text and data-mine the content in such documents, for the purposes of academic research, subject always to the full Conditions of use: http://www.nature.com/authors/editorial_policies/license.html#terms

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                Life sciences

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