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      Relationships among behavioral beliefs, past behaviors, attitudes and behavioral intentions toward healthy menu selection

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          Abstract

          BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES

          Obesity is a serious concern worldwide, for which the restaurant industry holds partial responsibility. This study was conducted to estimate restaurant consumers' intention to select healthy menu items and to examine the relationships among behavioral beliefs, past behaviors, attitudes and behavioral intentions, which are known to be major determinants of consumer behaviors.

          SUBJECTS/METHODS

          An online, self-administered survey was distributed for data collection. The study sample consisted of customers who reported having visited casual dining restaurants in the last three months at the time of the survey. Structural equation modeling was used to verify the fit of the proposed research model.

          RESULTS

          Structural equation modeling revealed that the proposed model supports the sequential, mediated (indirect) relationships among behavioral beliefs, past behaviors, attitudes and behavioral intentions toward healthy menu selection.

          CONCLUSION

          This study contributes to the available literature regarding obesity by adding past behaviors, one of the most influential variables involved in prediction of future behaviors of consumers, to the TPB model, enabling a better understanding of restaurant consumers' rational decision process regarding healthy menu choices. The results of this study provide practical implications for restaurant practitioners and government agencies regarding ways to promote healthy menus.

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          Most cited references 29

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          Attitude-behavior relations: A theoretical analysis and review of empirical research.

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            Choice of Travel Mode in the Theory of Planned Behavior: The Roles of Past Behavior, Habit, and Reasoned Action

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              The theory of planned behavior and healthy eating.

              Application of the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to healthy eating in 144 health promotion clinic attendees is reported. Respondents completed self-report TPB measures after the clinic (Time 1) and 6 months later (Time 2) with a measure of perceived past behavior. Intention stability was assessed on Time 1-2 differences. Six years later (Time 3), respondents completed measures of healthy eating intentions and behavior. Intentions were predicted by attitudes, perceived behavioral control, and perceived past behavior (cross-sectionally). Healthy eating behavior (Time 3) was predicted from intentions (Time 2). As intention stability increased, intentions and perceived past behavior became stronger and weaker predictors of behavior, respectively. Implications for understanding health cognitions in long-term performance of health behavior are discussed.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nutr Res Pract
                Nutr Res Pract
                NRP
                Nutrition Research and Practice
                The Korean Nutrition Society and the Korean Society of Community Nutrition
                1976-1457
                2005-6168
                August 2018
                30 July 2018
                : 12
                : 4
                : 348-354
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of Food and Nutrition, Institute of Symbiotic Life-TECH, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 03722, Korea.
                [2 ]International Center for Hospitality Research and Development, Dedman School of Hospitality, Florida State University, 288 Champions Way UCB 4117 Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA.
                Author notes
                Corresponding Author: Sunny Ham, Tel. 82-2-2123-3121, sham2@ 123456yonsei.ac.kr
                Article
                10.4162/nrp.2018.12.4.348
                6078860
                ©2018 The Korean Nutrition Society and the Korean Society of Community Nutrition

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Categories
                Original Research

                Nutrition & Dietetics

                obesity, restaurants, attitude, belief, consumer behavior

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