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First deep underground observation of rotational signals from an earthquake at teleseismic distance using a large ring laser gyroscope

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      Abstract

      Recent advances in large ring laser gyroscopes (RLG) technologies opened the possibility to observe rotations of the ground with sensitivities up to \(10^{-11}\) \(\frac{rad}{s}\) over the frequency band of seismological interest (0.01-1Hz), thus opening the way to a new geophysical discipline, i.e. rotational seismology. A measure of rotations in seismology is of fundamental interest for (a) the determination of all the six degrees of freedom that characterize a rigid body motion, and (b) the quantitative estimate of the rotational motions contaminating ground translation measurements obtained from standard seismometers. Within this framework, this paper presents and describes GINGERino, a new large observatory-class RLG located in Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS), one national laboratories of the INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare). We also report unprecedented observations and analyses of the roto-translational signals from a tele-seismic event observed in such a deep underground environment.

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      Preliminary reference Earth model

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        Ring laser detection of rotations from teleseismic waves

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          New portable sensor system for rotational seismic motion measurements.

          A new mechanical sensor system for recording the rotation of ground velocity has been constructed. It is based on measurements of differential motions between paired sensors mounted along the perimeter of a rigid (undeformable) disk. The elementary sensors creating the pairs are sensitive low-frequency geophones currently used in seismic exploration to record translational motions. The main features of the new rotational seismic sensor system are flat characteristics in the wide frequency range from 1 to 200 Hz and sensitivity limit of the order of 10(-8) rad/s. Notable advantages are small dimensions, portability, easy installation and operation in the field, and the possibility of calibrating the geophones in situ simultaneously with the measurement. An important feature of the instrument is that it provides records of translational seismic motions together with rotations, which allows many important seismological applications. We have used the new sensor system to record the vertical rotation velocity due to a small earthquake of M(L)=2.2, which occurred within the earthquake swarm in Western Bohemia in autumn 2008. We found good agreement of the rotation record with the transverse acceleration as predicted by theory. This measurement demonstrates that this device has a much wider application than just to prospecting measurements, for which it was originally designed.
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            Journal
            1601.05960

            Geophysics

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