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      Adaptive boosting-based computational model for predicting potential miRNA-disease associations

      1 , 1 , 1

      Bioinformatics

      Oxford University Press (OUP)

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          Abstract

          Motivation

          Recent studies have shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) play a critical part in several biological processes and dysregulation of miRNAs is related with numerous complex human diseases. Thus, in-depth research of miRNAs and their association with human diseases can help us to solve many problems.

          Results

          Due to the high cost of traditional experimental methods, revealing disease-related miRNAs through computational models is a more economical and efficient way. Considering the disadvantages of previous models, in this paper, we developed adaptive boosting for miRNA-disease association prediction (ABMDA) to predict potential associations between diseases and miRNAs. We balanced the positive and negative samples by performing random sampling based on k-means clustering on negative samples, whose process was quick and easy, and our model had higher efficiency and scalability for large datasets than previous methods. As a boosting technology, ABMDA was able to improve the accuracy of given learning algorithm by integrating weak classifiers that could score samples to form a strong classifier based on corresponding weights. Here, we used decision tree as our weak classifier. As a result, the area under the curve (AUC) of global and local leave-one-out cross validation reached 0.9170 and 0.8220, respectively. What is more, the mean and the standard deviation of AUCs achieved 0.9023 and 0.0016, respectively in 5-fold cross validation. Besides, in the case studies of three important human cancers, 49, 50 and 50 out of the top 50 predicted miRNAs for colon neoplasms, hepatocellular carcinoma and breast neoplasms were confirmed by the databases and experimental literatures.

          Availability and implementation

          The code and dataset of ABMDA are freely available at https://github.com/githubcode007/ABMDA.

          Supplementary information

          Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 53

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          Global cancer statistics, 2012.

          Cancer constitutes an enormous burden on society in more and less economically developed countries alike. The occurrence of cancer is increasing because of the growth and aging of the population, as well as an increasing prevalence of established risk factors such as smoking, overweight, physical inactivity, and changing reproductive patterns associated with urbanization and economic development. Based on GLOBOCAN estimates, about 14.1 million new cancer cases and 8.2 million deaths occurred in 2012 worldwide. Over the years, the burden has shifted to less developed countries, which currently account for about 57% of cases and 65% of cancer deaths worldwide. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among males in both more and less developed countries, and has surpassed breast cancer as the leading cause of cancer death among females in more developed countries; breast cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death among females in less developed countries. Other leading causes of cancer death in more developed countries include colorectal cancer among males and females and prostate cancer among males. In less developed countries, liver and stomach cancer among males and cervical cancer among females are also leading causes of cancer death. Although incidence rates for all cancers combined are nearly twice as high in more developed than in less developed countries in both males and females, mortality rates are only 8% to 15% higher in more developed countries. This disparity reflects regional differences in the mix of cancers, which is affected by risk factors and detection practices, and/or the availability of treatment. Risk factors associated with the leading causes of cancer death include tobacco use (lung, colorectal, stomach, and liver cancer), overweight/obesity and physical inactivity (breast and colorectal cancer), and infection (liver, stomach, and cervical cancer). A substantial portion of cancer cases and deaths could be prevented by broadly applying effective prevention measures, such as tobacco control, vaccination, and the use of early detection tests. © 2015 American Cancer Society.
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            MicroRNAs: target recognition and regulatory functions.

             David Bartel (2009)
            MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous approximately 23 nt RNAs that play important gene-regulatory roles in animals and plants by pairing to the mRNAs of protein-coding genes to direct their posttranscriptional repression. This review outlines the current understanding of miRNA target recognition in animals and discusses the widespread impact of miRNAs on both the expression and evolution of protein-coding genes.
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              Cancer statistics, 2018

              Each year, the American Cancer Society estimates the numbers of new cancer cases and deaths that will occur in the United States and compiles the most recent data on cancer incidence, mortality, and survival. Incidence data, available through 2014, were collected by the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Program; the National Program of Cancer Registries; and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries. Mortality data, available through 2015, were collected by the National Center for Health Statistics. In 2018, 1,735,350 new cancer cases and 609,640 cancer deaths are projected to occur in the United States. Over the past decade of data, the cancer incidence rate (2005-2014) was stable in women and declined by approximately 2% annually in men, while the cancer death rate (2006-2015) declined by about 1.5% annually in both men and women. The combined cancer death rate dropped continuously from 1991 to 2015 by a total of 26%, translating to approximately 2,378,600 fewer cancer deaths than would have been expected if death rates had remained at their peak. Of the 10 leading causes of death, only cancer declined from 2014 to 2015. In 2015, the cancer death rate was 14% higher in non-Hispanic blacks (NHBs) than non-Hispanic whites (NHWs) overall (death rate ratio [DRR], 1.14; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.13-1.15), but the racial disparity was much larger for individuals aged <65 years (DRR, 1.31; 95% CI, 1.29-1.32) compared with those aged ≥65 years (DRR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.06-1.09) and varied substantially by state. For example, the cancer death rate was lower in NHBs than NHWs in Massachusetts for all ages and in New York for individuals aged ≥65 years, whereas for those aged <65 years, it was 3 times higher in NHBs in the District of Columbia (DRR, 2.89; 95% CI, 2.16-3.91) and about 50% higher in Wisconsin (DRR, 1.78; 95% CI, 1.56-2.02), Kansas (DRR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.25-1.81), Louisiana (DRR, 1.49; 95% CI, 1.38-1.60), Illinois (DRR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.39-1.57), and California (DRR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.38-1.54). Larger racial inequalities in young and middle-aged adults probably partly reflect less access to high-quality health care. CA Cancer J Clin 2018;68:7-30. © 2018 American Cancer Society.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Bioinformatics
                Oxford University Press (OUP)
                1367-4803
                1460-2059
                November 15 2019
                November 01 2019
                April 30 2019
                November 15 2019
                November 01 2019
                April 30 2019
                : 35
                : 22
                : 4730-4738
                Affiliations
                [1 ]School of Information and Control Engineering, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221116, China
                Article
                10.1093/bioinformatics/btz297
                © 2019

                https://academic.oup.com/journals/pages/open_access/funder_policies/chorus/standard_publication_model

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