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      Antimicrobial agents from plants: antibacterial activity of plant volatile oils

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      Journal of Applied Microbiology
      Wiley

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          Abstract

          The volatile oils of black pepper [Piper nigrum L. (Piperaceae)], clove [Syzygium aromaticum (L.) Merr. & Perry (Myrtaceae)], geranium [Pelargonium graveolens L'Herit (Geraniaceae)], nutmeg [Myristica fragrans Houtt. (Myristicaceae), oregano [Origanum vulgare ssp. hirtum (Link) Letsw. (Lamiaceae)] and thyme [Thymus vulgaris L. (Lamiaceae)] were assessed for antibacterial activity against 25 different genera of bacteria. These included animal and plant pathogens, food poisoning and spoilage bacteria. The volatile oils exhibited considerable inhibitory effects against all the organisms under test while their major components demonstrated various degrees of growth inhibition.

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          Antimicrobial properties of plant essential oils and essences against five important food-borne pathogens.

          The antimicrobial properties of 21 plant essential oils and two essences were investigated against five important food-borne pathogens, Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella enteritidis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes. The oils of bay, cinnamon, clove and thyme were the most inhibitory, each having a bacteriostatic concentration of 0.075% or less against all five pathogens. In general, Gram-positive bacteria were more sensitive to inhibition by plant essential oils than the Gram-negative bacteria. Campylobacter jejuni was the most resistant of the bacteria investigated to plant essential oils, with only the oils of bay and thyme having a bacteriocidal concentration of less than 1%. At 35 degrees C, L. monocytogenes was extremely sensitive to the oil of nutmeg. A concentration of less than 0.01% was bacteriostatic and 0.05% was bacteriocidal, but when the temperature was reduced to 4 degrees, the bacteriostatic concentration was increased to 0.5% and the bacteriocidal concentration to greater than 1%.
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            Antibacterial properties of plant essential oils

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              Antibacterial activity of some essential oil components against five foodborne pathogens

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Journal of Applied Microbiology
                J Appl Microbiol
                Wiley
                1364-5072
                1365-2672
                February 2000
                February 2000
                : 88
                : 2
                : 308-316
                Article
                10.1046/j.1365-2672.2000.00969.x
                10736000
                77e72803-b521-482a-a3f5-2131403bf360
                © 2000

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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