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      Brain activity is not only for thinking

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      Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences

      Elsevier BV

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          Most cited references 107

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          Theta oscillations in the hippocampus.

          Theta oscillations represent the "on-line" state of the hippocampus. The extracellular currents underlying theta waves are generated mainly by the entorhinal input, CA3 (Schaffer) collaterals, and voltage-dependent Ca(2+) currents in pyramidal cell dendrites. The rhythm is believed to be critical for temporal coding/decoding of active neuronal ensembles and the modification of synaptic weights. Nevertheless, numerous critical issues regarding both the generation of theta oscillations and their functional significance remain challenges for future research.
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            Learning representations by back-propagating errors

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              Functional connectivity in the motor cortex of resting human brain using echo-planar MRI.

              An MRI time course of 512 echo-planar images (EPI) in resting human brain obtained every 250 ms reveals fluctuations in signal intensity in each pixel that have a physiologic origin. Regions of the sensorimotor cortex that were activated secondary to hand movement were identified using functional MRI methodology (FMRI). Time courses of low frequency (< 0.1 Hz) fluctuations in resting brain were observed to have a high degree of temporal correlation (P < 10(-3)) within these regions and also with time courses in several other regions that can be associated with motor function. It is concluded that correlation of low frequency fluctuations, which may arise from fluctuations in blood oxygenation or flow, is a manifestation of functional connectivity of the brain.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences
                Current Opinion in Behavioral Sciences
                Elsevier BV
                23521546
                August 2021
                August 2021
                : 40
                : 130-136
                Article
                10.1016/j.cobeha.2021.04.002
                © 2021

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