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      IMPROVING THE ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF FISH-FARMING HOUSES: A COMPARATIVE PASSIVE DESIGN STUDY IN SOUTH KOREA

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          ABSTRACT

          Aquaculture in South Korea largely involves crudely-built plastic fishery houses that consume excessive electricity and produce carbon emissions. This study explores a potential method to make Korean aquaculture more sustainable by suggesting design alternatives that can save energy and costs. To this end, the authors compare the energy use and indoor environments of three different designs through field mockups. The three designs include (i) a triple-layered plastic screen house (Design 1), (ii) an insulated vault house (Design 2), and (iii) a passive-house design (Design 3), in addition to (iv) a single-layered plastic house (baseline). Our findings indicate that, compared to the baseline, operational electricity was reduced to 57.81% in Design 1, 53.92 % in Design 2, and 40.59% in Design 3. Moreover, Designs 2 and 3 were able to mitigate indoor temperature fluctuations in winter. Design 1 showed a relatively unstable temperature distribution during the night but offered better farming conditions than the baseline. Humidity often rose to 100% but did not affect the maintenance of a desirable fish and workplace environment. Even a high concentration of carbon dioxide of up to 3,000 ppm in Designs 1 and 2 was not expected to harm farmers’ health. Cost analyses revealed that construction expenses increased to 20.9% in Design 1, 135.8% in Design 2, and 73.9% in Design 3 due to large quantities of materials and labor. Considering trade-offs with energy saving, the payback period is 7.2 years for Design 1, 35.5 years for Design 2, and 17.9 years for Design 3. Given that the lifetime expectancy of Designs 1 and 3 is over two years, the study’s results confirm that Designs 1 and 3 have a comparative advantage in producing sustainable fish-farming houses.

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          Carbon dioxide generation rates for building occupants

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            Energy Consumption Prediction of a Greenhouse and Optimization of Daily Average Temperature

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              Integration of solar technology to modern greenhouse in China: Current status, challenges and prospect

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                jgrb
                Journal of Green Building
                College Publishing
                1943-4618
                1552-6100
                Spring 2020
                14 July 2020
                : 15
                : 2
                : 71-90
                Author notes

                1. Department of Architecture, Ajou University, 206 World cup-ro, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon-Si, Gyeonggi-do, 443-749, South Korea, hwy@ 123456ajou.ac.kr

                *Corresponding Author
                Article
                jgb.15.2.71
                10.3992/1943-4618.15.2.71

                Volumes 1-10 of JOGB are open access and do not require permission for use, though proper citation should be given. To view the licenses, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/

                Page count
                Pages: 20
                Product
                Categories
                RESEARCH ARTICLES

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