Blog
About

250
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Aesthetic valence of visual illusions

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Visual illusions constitute an interesting perceptual phenomenon, but they also have an aesthetic and affective dimension. We hypothesized that the illusive nature itself causes the increased aesthetic and affective valence of illusions compared with their non-illusory counterparts. We created pairs of stimuli. One qualified as a standard visual illusion whereas the other one did not, although they were matched in as many perceptual dimensions as possible. The phenomenal quality of being an illusion had significant effects on “Aesthetic Experience” (fascinating, irresistible, exceptional, etc), “Evaluation” (pleasant, cheerful, clear, bright, etc), “Arousal” (interesting, imaginative, complex, diverse, etc), and “Regularity” (balanced, coherent, clear, realistic, etc). A subsequent multiple regression analysis suggested that Arousal was a better predictor of Aesthetic Experience than Evaluation. The findings of this study demonstrate that illusion is a phenomenal quality of the percept which has measurable aesthetic and affective valence.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 71

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: not found
          • Article: not found

          Comparing correlated correlation coefficients.

            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Pupillary and cardiac activity during visual attention.

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Emotional Responses to Art: From Collation and Arousal to Cognition and Emotion.

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Graduate School of Letters, Ritsumeikan University, Kyoto, 56-1 Toji-in Kitamachi, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8577, Japan; e-mail: gr0050fs@ 123456ed.ritsumei.ac.jp ; jasminastevanov@ 123456yahoo.com
                Laboratory of Experimental Psychology, Department of Psychology, University of Belgrade, Čika Ljubina 18-20, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia; e-mail: smarkovi@ 123456f.bg.ac.rs
                Graduate School of Letters, Ritsumeikan University, Kyoto, 56-1 Toji-in Kitamachi, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8577, Japan; e-mail: akitaoka@ 123456lt.ritsumei.ac.jp
                Journal
                Iperception
                Iperception
                pmed
                i-Perception
                Pion
                2041-6695
                2012
                29 February 2012
                : 3
                : 2
                : 112-140
                Affiliations
                Graduate School of Letters, Ritsumeikan University, Kyoto, 56-1 Toji-in Kitamachi, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8577, Japan; e-mail: gr0050fs@ 123456ed.ritsumei.ac.jp ; jasminastevanov@ 123456yahoo.com
                Laboratory of Experimental Psychology, Department of Psychology, University of Belgrade, Čika Ljubina 18-20, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia; e-mail: smarkovi@ 123456f.bg.ac.rs
                Graduate School of Letters, Ritsumeikan University, Kyoto, 56-1 Toji-in Kitamachi, Kita-ku, Kyoto 603-8577, Japan; e-mail: akitaoka@ 123456lt.ritsumei.ac.jp
                Article
                10.1068/i0455aap
                3485819
                23145272
                Copyright © 2012 J Stevanov, S Marković, A Kitaoka

                This open-access article is distributed under a Creative Commons Licence, which permits noncommercial use, distribution, and reproduction, provided the original author(s) and source are credited and no alterations are made.

                Categories
                Art and Perception

                Comments

                Comment on this article