28
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Acid rain and air pollution: 50 years of progress in environmental science and policy

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Because of its serious large-scale effects on ecosystems and its transboundary nature, acid rain received for a few decades at the end of the last century wide scientific and public interest, leading to coordinated policy actions in Europe and North America. Through these actions, in particular those under the UNECE Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution, air emissions were substantially reduced, and ecosystem impacts decreased. Widespread scientific research, long-term monitoring, and integrated assessment modelling formed the basis for the policy agreements. In this paper, which is based on an international symposium organised to commemorate 50 years of successful integration of air pollution research and policy, we briefly describe the scientific findings that provided the foundation for the policy development. We also discuss important characteristics of the science–policy interactions, such as the critical loads concept and the large-scale ecosystem field studies. Finally, acid rain and air pollution are set in the context of future societal developments and needs, e.g. the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. We also highlight the need to maintain and develop supporting scientific infrastructures.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 22

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Aerosols, climate, and the hydrological cycle.

          Human activities are releasing tiny particles (aerosols) into the atmosphere. These human-made aerosols enhance scattering and absorption of solar radiation. They also produce brighter clouds that are less efficient at releasing precipitation. These in turn lead to large reductions in the amount of solar irradiance reaching Earth's surface, a corresponding increase in solar heating of the atmosphere, changes in the atmospheric temperature structure, suppression of rainfall, and less efficient removal of pollutants. These aerosol effects can lead to a weaker hydrological cycle, which connects directly to availability and quality of fresh water, a major environmental issue of the 21st century.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Cost-effective control of air quality and greenhouse gases in Europe: Modeling and policy applications

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Response of Arctic temperature to changes in emissions of short-lived climate forcers

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                peringe.grennfelt@ivl.se
                Anna.engleryd@swedishepa.se
                martin.forsius@ymparisto.fi
                oysteinh@met.no
                rodhe@misu.su.se
                ellis_cowling@ncsu.edu
                Journal
                Ambio
                Ambio
                Ambio
                Springer Netherlands (Dordrecht )
                0044-7447
                1654-7209
                21 September 2019
                21 September 2019
                April 2020
                : 49
                : 4
                : 849-864
                Affiliations
                [1 ]GRID grid.5809.4, ISNI 0000 0000 9987 7806, IVL Swedish Environmental Research Institute, ; PO Box 53021, 40014 Gothenburg, Sweden
                [2 ]GRID grid.425595.a, ISNI 0000 0001 2243 2048, Swedish Environmental Protection Agency, ; Virkesvägen 2F, 10648 Stockholm, Sweden
                [3 ]GRID grid.410381.f, ISNI 0000 0001 1019 1419, Finnish Environment Institute, ; Latokartanonkaari 11, 00790 Helsinki, Finland
                [4 ]GRID grid.82418.37, ISNI 0000 0001 0226 1499, The Norwegian Meteorological Institute, ; P.O. Box 43, Blindern, 0313 Oslo, Norway
                [5 ]GRID grid.10548.38, ISNI 0000 0004 1936 9377, Department of Meteorology, , Stockholm University, ; 10691 Stockholm, Sweden
                [6 ]GRID grid.40803.3f, ISNI 0000 0001 2173 6074, Department of Forestry and Environmental Resources, , NC State University, ; 5211 Glenhope Court, Cary, NC 27511 USA
                Article
                1244
                10.1007/s13280-019-01244-4
                7028813
                31542884
                © The Author(s) 2019

                Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

                Funding
                Funded by: Nordic Council of Ministers
                Funded by: Swedish Environmental Protection Agency
                Funded by: Mistra Foundation
                Categories
                Review
                Custom metadata
                © Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences 2020

                Comments

                Comment on this article