Blog
About

32
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Movement visualisation in virtual reality rehabilitation of the lower limb: a systematic review

      , 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 1 , 5 , 6 , 7

      BioMedical Engineering OnLine

      BioMed Central

      Robotics: Science and Systems 2013

      28-Jun-16

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background

          Virtual reality (VR) based applications play an increasing role in motor rehabilitation. They provide an interactive and individualized environment in addition to increased motivation during motor tasks as well as facilitating motor learning through multimodal sensory information. Several previous studies have shown positive effect of VR-based treatments for lower extremity motor rehabilitation in neurological conditions, but the characteristics of these VR applications have not been systematically investigated. The visual information on the user’s movement in the virtual environment, also called movement visualisation (MV), is a key element of VR-based rehabilitation interventions. The present review proposes categorization of Movement Visualisations of VR-based rehabilitation therapy for neurological conditions and also summarises current research in lower limb application.

          Methods

          A systematic search of literature on VR-based intervention for gait and balance rehabilitation in neurological conditions was performed in the databases namely; MEDLINE (Ovid), AMED, EMBASE, CINAHL, and PsycInfo. Studies using non-virtual environments or applications to improve cognitive function, activities of daily living, or psychotherapy were excluded. The VR interventions of the included studies were analysed on their MV.

          Results

          In total 43 publications were selected based on the inclusion criteria. Seven distinct MV groups could be differentiated: indirect MV (N = 13), abstract MV (N = 11), augmented reality MV (N = 9), avatar MV (N = 5), tracking MV (N = 4), combined MV (N = 1), and no MV (N = 2). In two included articles the visualisation conditions included different MV groups within the same study. Additionally, differences in motor performance could not be analysed because of the differences in the study design. Three studies investigated different visualisations within the same MV group and hence limited information can be extracted from one study.

          Conclusions

          The review demonstrates that individuals’ movements during VR-based motor training can be displayed in different ways. Future studies are necessary to fundamentally explore the nature of this VR information and its effect on motor outcome.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 49

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Virtual environments for motor rehabilitation: review.

          In this paper, the current "state of the art" for virtual reality (VR) applications in the field of motor rehabilitation is reviewed. The paper begins with a brief overview of available equipment options. Next, a discussion of the scientific rationale for use of VR in motor rehabilitation is provided. Finally, the major portion of the paper describes the various VR systems that have been developed for use with patients, and the results of clinical studies reported to date in the literature. Areas covered include stroke rehabilitation (upper and lower extremity training, spatial and perceptual-motor training), acquired brain injury, Parkinson's disease, orthopedic rehabilitation, balance training, wheelchair mobility and functional activities of daily living training, and the newly developing field of telerehabilitation. Four major findings emerge from these studies: (1) people with disabilities appear capable of motor learning within virtual environments; (2) movements learned by people with disabilities in VR transfer to real world equivalent motor tasks in most cases, and in some cases even generalize to other untrained tasks; (3) in the few studies (n = 5) that have compared motor learning in real versus virtual environments, some advantage for VR training has been found in all cases; and (4) no occurrences of cybersickness in impaired populations have been reported to date in experiments where VR has been used to train motor abilities.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Visually controlled locomotion and visual orientation in animals.

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Virtual reality-based training improves community ambulation in individuals with stroke: a randomized controlled trial.

              This is a single blind randomized controlled trial to examine the effect of virtual reality-based training on the community ambulation in individuals with stroke. Twenty subjects with stroke were assigned randomly to either the control group (n=9) or the experimental group (n=11). Subjects in the control group received the treadmill training. Subjects in the experimental group underwent the virtual reality-based treadmill training. Walking speed, community walking time, walking ability questionnaire (WAQ), and activities-specific balance confidence (ABC) scale were evaluated. Subjects in the experimental group improved significantly in walking speed, community walking time, and WAQ score at posttraining and 1-month follow-up periods. Their ABC score also significantly increased at posttraining but did not maintain at follow-up period. Regarding the between-group comparisons, the experimental group improved significantly more than control group in walking speed (P=0.03) and community walking time (P=0.04) at posttraining period and in WAQ score (P=0.03) at follow-up period. Our results support the perceived benefits of gait training programs that incorporate virtual reality to augment the community ambulation of individuals with stroke.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                luara.santos@iwf.tu-berlin.de
                oliver.christ@fhnw.ch
                kedar.mate@mail.mcgill.ca
                henning.schmidt@ipk.fraunhofer.de
                joerg.krueger@ipk.fraunhofer.de
                christian.dohle@median-kliniken.de
                Conference
                Biomed Eng Online
                Biomed Eng Online
                BioMedical Engineering OnLine
                BioMed Central (London )
                1475-925X
                19 December 2016
                19 December 2016
                2016
                : 15
                Issue : Suppl 3 Issue sponsor : Publication of this supplement has not been supported by sponsorship. Information about the source of funding for publication charges can be found in the individual articles. The articles have undergone the journal's standard peer review process for supplements. The Supplement Editors declare that they have no competing interests.
                Affiliations
                [1 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2292 8254, GRID grid.6734.6, Rehabilitation Robotics Group (TU Berlin/ Fraunhofer IPK), Department of Industrial Automation Technology, , Technische Universität Berlin, ; Pascalstr. 8-9, 10587 Berlin, Germany
                [2 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2292 8254, GRID grid.6734.6, DFG Research Training Group Prometei, , Technische Universität Berlin, ; Marchstr. 23, 10587 Berlin, Germany
                [3 ]Institute Humans in Complex Systems, School of Applied Psychology, University of Applied Sciences and Arts Nortwestern Switzerland, Riggenbachstrasse 16, Olten, Switzerland
                [4 ]ISNI 0000 0004 1936 8649, GRID grid.14709.3b, School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, , McGill University, ; 3654 Promenade Sir William Osler Montreal, Quebec, H3G 1Y5 Canada
                [5 ]ISNI 0000 0001 0945 2298, GRID grid.469819.b, Rehabilitation Robotics Group (Fraunhofer IPK/ TU Berlin), Department of Automation Technology, , Fraunhofer Institute for Production Systems and Design Technology (IPK), ; Pascalstr. 8-9, 10587 Berlin, Germany
                [6 ]Department of Neurological Rehabilitation, MEDIAN Klinik Berlin-Kladow, Kladower Damm 223, 14089 Berlin, Germany
                [7 ]ISNI 0000 0001 2218 4662, GRID grid.6363.0, Center for Stroke Research Berlin, , Charité-University Medicine Berlin, ; Charitéplatz 1, 10117 Berlin, Germany
                Article
                289
                10.1186/s12938-016-0289-4
                5249036
                28105952
                © The Author(s) 2016

                Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

                Robotics: Science and Systems 2013
                Berlin, Germany
                28-Jun-16
                Categories
                Review
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2016

                Biomedical engineering

                Comments

                Comment on this article