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      Nanocomposite scaffolds for accelerating chronic wound healing by enhancing angiogenesis

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          Abstract

          Skin is the body’s first barrier against external pathogens that maintains the homeostasis of the body. Any serious damage to the skin could have an impact on human health and quality of life. Tissue engineering aims to improve the quality of damaged tissue regeneration. One of the most effective treatments for skin tissue regeneration is to improve angiogenesis during the healing period. Over the last decade, there has been an impressive growth of new potential applications for nanobiomaterials in tissue engineering. Various approaches have been developed to improve the rate and quality of the healing process using angiogenic nanomaterials. In this review, we focused on molecular mechanisms and key factors in angiogenesis, the role of nanobiomaterials in angiogenesis, and scaffold-based tissue engineering approaches for accelerated wound healing based on improved angiogenesis.

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          Ror2 signaling regulates Golgi structure and transport through IFT20 for tumor invasiveness

          Signaling through the Ror2 receptor tyrosine kinase promotes invadopodia formation for tumor invasion. Here, we identify intraflagellar transport 20 (IFT20) as a new target of this signaling in tumors that lack primary cilia, and find that IFT20 mediates the ability of Ror2 signaling to induce the invasiveness of these tumors. We also find that IFT20 regulates the nucleation of Golgi-derived microtubules by affecting the GM130-AKAP450 complex, which promotes Golgi ribbon formation in achieving polarized secretion for cell migration and invasion. Furthermore, IFT20 promotes the efficiency of transport through the Golgi complex. These findings shed new insights into how Ror2 signaling promotes tumor invasiveness, and also advance the understanding of how Golgi structure and transport can be regulated.
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            3D bioprinting of tissues and organs.

            Additive manufacturing, otherwise known as three-dimensional (3D) printing, is driving major innovations in many areas, such as engineering, manufacturing, art, education and medicine. Recent advances have enabled 3D printing of biocompatible materials, cells and supporting components into complex 3D functional living tissues. 3D bioprinting is being applied to regenerative medicine to address the need for tissues and organs suitable for transplantation. Compared with non-biological printing, 3D bioprinting involves additional complexities, such as the choice of materials, cell types, growth and differentiation factors, and technical challenges related to the sensitivities of living cells and the construction of tissues. Addressing these complexities requires the integration of technologies from the fields of engineering, biomaterials science, cell biology, physics and medicine. 3D bioprinting has already been used for the generation and transplantation of several tissues, including multilayered skin, bone, vascular grafts, tracheal splints, heart tissue and cartilaginous structures. Other applications include developing high-throughput 3D-bioprinted tissue models for research, drug discovery and toxicology.
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              PEGylated nanographene oxide for delivery of water-insoluble cancer drugs.

              It is known that many potent, often aromatic drugs are water insoluble, which has hampered their use for disease treatment. In this work, we functionalized nanographene oxide (NGO), a novel graphitic material, with branched polyethylene glycol (PEG) to obtain a biocompatible NGO-PEG conjugate stable in various biological solutions, and used them for attaching hydrophobic aromatic molecules including a camptothecin (CPT) analogue, SN38, noncovalently via pi-pi stacking. The resulting NGO-PEG-SN38 complex exhibited excellent water solubility while maintaining its high cancer cell killing potency similar to that of the free SN38 molecules in organic solvents. The efficacy of NGO-PEG-SN38 was far higher than that of irinotecan (CPT-11), a FDA-approved water soluble SN38 prodrug used for the treatment of colon cancer. Our results showed that graphene is a novel class of material promising for biological applications including future in vivo cancer treatment with various aromatic, low-solubility drugs.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                hamednosratibio@gmail.com
                Journal
                J Nanobiotechnology
                J Nanobiotechnology
                Journal of Nanobiotechnology
                BioMed Central (London )
                1477-3155
                4 January 2021
                4 January 2021
                2021
                : 19
                : 1
                Affiliations
                [1 ]GRID grid.440801.9, ISNI 0000 0004 0384 8883, Department of Tissue Engineering and Applied Cell Sciences, School of Advanced Technologies, , Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences, ; Shahrekord, Iran
                [2 ]GRID grid.411746.1, ISNI 0000 0004 4911 7066, Department of Virology, , Iran University of Medical Sciences, ; Tehran, Iran
                [3 ]GRID grid.46072.37, ISNI 0000 0004 0612 7950, School of Mechanical Engineering, College of Engineering, , University of Tehran, ; Tehran, Iran
                [4 ]Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Golpayegan University of Technology, Golpayegan, Iran
                [5 ]GRID grid.440801.9, ISNI 0000 0004 0384 8883, Department of Molecular Medicine, School of Advanced Technologies, , Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences, ; Shahrekord, Iran
                [6 ]GRID grid.440801.9, ISNI 0000 0004 0384 8883, Department of Medical Biotechnology, School of Advanced Technologies, , Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences, ; Shahrekord, Iran
                [7 ]GRID grid.411950.8, ISNI 0000 0004 0611 9280, Endometrium and Endometriosis Research Center, , Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, ; Hamadan, Iran
                [8 ]GRID grid.411950.8, ISNI 0000 0004 0611 9280, Department of Anatomical Sciences, School of Medicine, , Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, ; Hamadan, Iran
                Author information
                http://orcid.org/0000-0002-6952-1109
                Article
                755
                10.1186/s12951-020-00755-7
                7784275
                33397416
                8f4f87a6-5b0b-4511-8e85-eb107962dbb8
                © The Author(s) 2021

                Open AccessThis article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver ( http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.

                History
                : 27 October 2020
                : 12 December 2020
                Categories
                Review
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2021

                Biotechnology
                scaffold,angiogenesis,chronic wound,wound healing,skin tissue engineering,nanobiotechnology

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