7
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      Knowledge and attitude about sexually transmitted infections other than HIV among college students

      research-article

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Background:

          Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are the infections which are mainly transmitted through sexual intercourse. Young individuals in the age group of 16 to 24 years are considered to be at more risk for STIs compared to older adults. Young individuals are more likely to practice unprotected sex and have multiple sexual partners. If the STIs are not treated adequately, it can lead to various complications.Most of the people may be aware about HIV/AIDs because of the awareness created by media and the government programs, however knowledge about STIs other than HIV/AIDS is low in the developing countries.

          Materials and Methods:

          This study was a descriptive cross sectional study to assess the knowledge, awareness and attitude of college students about STIs other than HIV. A total of 350 engineering students from various semesters were included in the study. They were asked to fill up an anonymous questionnaire.

          Results:

          Two hundred and fifty six (73%) males and 94 (27%) females participated in the study. 313 (90%) students had heard about sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and 223 (64%) students had heard about STIs other than HIV. 99% of students knew about HIV where as less than 50% of students knew about other STIs. Teachers, internet and media were the source of information for most of the participants. Almost 75% of the students knew about the modes of transmission of STIs. Less than 50% of the participants knew about the symptoms of STIs and complications. Also attitude of the students towards sexual health and prevention of STIs was variable.

          Conclusion:

          The findings of our study shows that it is important to orient the students about sexual health and safe sexual practices as it will go a long way in prevention and control of STIs. Also the morbidities and complications associated with STIs can be prevented.

          Related collections

          Most cited references17

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Barriers to asymptomatic screening and other STD services for adolescents and young adults: focus group discussions

          Background Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are a major public health problem among young people and can lead to the spread of HIV. Previous studies have primarily addressed barriers to STD care for symptomatic patients. The purpose of our study was to identify perceptions about existing barriers to and ideal services for STDs, especially asymptomatic screening, among young people in a southeastern community. Methods Eight focus group discussions including 53 White, African American, and Latino youth (age 14–24) were conducted. Results Perceived barriers to care included lack of knowledge of STDs and available services, cost, shame associated with seeking services, long clinic waiting times, discrimination, and urethral specimen collection methods. Perceived features of ideal STD services included locations close to familiar places, extended hours, and urine-based screening. Television was perceived as the most effective route of disseminating STD information. Conclusions Further research is warranted to evaluate improving convenience, efficiency, and privacy of existing services; adding urine-based screening and new services closer to neighborhoods; and using mass media to disseminate STD information as strategies to increase STD screening.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: found
            Is Open Access

            Awareness of school students on sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and their sexual behavior: a cross-sectional study conducted in Pulau Pinang, Malaysia

            Background Sexually transmitted Infections (STIs) rank among the most important health issues for the people especially the young adults worldwide. Young people tend to engage in sexual activity at younger ages in the past decade than in the 1970s, and 1980s. Knowledge is an essential precursor of sexual risk reduction. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Pulau Pinang, Malaysia, to produce the baseline information about school students' awareness and perception about sexually transmitted Infections (STIs) and their sexual activity to help establish control and education programmes. Methods Students from form 4 (aged between 15 to 16 years), form 5 (aged between 16 to 17 years) and form 6 (aged between 18 to 20 years) in their class rooms were approached and asked to complete self administered and anonymous pre-validated questionnaires. SPSS for windows version 13 was used to analyze the results statistically and results were presented in tabular form. Results Data was collected from 1139 students aged between 15 to 20 years, 10.6% of which claimed that they never heard about STIs. Sexual experience related significantly with gender, race, and education level. Approximately 12.6% claimed to have sexual experience of which 75.7% had their sexual debut at 15-19 years and 38.2% were having more than 3 partners. Sexual experience was found to be significantly associated with gender (p = 0.003), ethnicity (p = 0.001) and education level (p = 0.030). However, multiple partner behaviour was significantly associated only with gender (p = 0.010). Mean knowledge score was 11.60 ± 8.781 and knowledge level was significantly associated with religion (p = 0.005) education level (p = 0.000), course stream (p = 0.000), socioeconomic class (p = 0.000) and sexual experience (p = 0.022). Conclusions It was concluded that school students have moderate level of knowledge about STIs although they are sexually active. Interventions such as reinforcing the link between STIs and HIV/AIDS, assessing the current status of sexuality education in schools and arranging public talks and seminars focusing on STIs prevention education are needed to improve their awareness.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Knowledge, attitude and practice about sexually transmitted diseases among university students in Kampala.

              Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) remain an important cause of morbidity and mortality among women in the child-bearing age. In order to institute appropriate preventive measures there is need to establish the profile of knowledge of the predisposing factors and causation of STDs, attitude to sexual practice and sexual patterns among the susceptible young people, such as university students. Non medical university students, Makerere University. Descriptive cross sectional study. A detailed questionnaire identifying socio-demographic characteristics, sexual patterns, knowledge of STDs as well as attitudes towards prevention of STDs was administered to 400 non medical university students of Makerere University. Knowledge of the clinical features of gonorrhoea and AIDS was high; most knew the predisposing factors for STDs (multiple sexual partners 90%; unprotected sexual intercourse 93%; rape 81%; sex outside marriage 78%, and sex under the influence of alcohol 73%) but not so for syphilis. Males were three times more likely to contract STDs (27%) than their female (9%) counterparts. Whereas knowledge on methods of prevention was high (>90%) it was not followed by appropriate behavioural patterns. More female (33.5%) students had heard about Trichomonas vaginalis than males (23%); (((2) = 17.1; < 0.0001). This study has shown that more female than male students got information from their parents (((2) = 25.3; p < 0.001) while more male students had their source of information from previous sexual intercourse (((2) = 12.9; p = 0.001). The level of knowledge about STDs and their prevention is not matched by sexual behavioural patterns, and male students undertake more risky sexual behaviour. Sexual education should be introduced at the university as a means of increasing students' awareness about the problem and prevention of sexually transmitted diseases including HIV/AIDS.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Indian J Sex Transm Dis
                Indian J Sex Transm Dis
                IJSTD
                Indian Journal of Sexually Transmitted Diseases
                Medknow Publications & Media Pvt Ltd (India )
                0253-7184
                1998-3816
                Jan-Jun 2017
                : 38
                : 1
                : 10-14
                Affiliations
                [1]Department of Dermatology, STD and Leprosy, Sapthagiri Institute of Medical Sciences and Research Center, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
                Author notes
                Address for correspondence: Dr. Nagesh Tumkur Subbarao, No. 1586, Niharika, 17 th “A” Main, 1 st Stage, 5 th Block, HBR Layout, Bengaluru - 560 043, Karnataka, India. E-mail: drnageshts@ 123456gmail.com
                Article
                IJSTD-38-10
                10.4103/0253-7184.196888
                5389207
                96ef8317-2b74-419a-9acd-f5900e1fc536
                Copyright: © 2017 Indian Journal of Sexually Transmitted Diseases and AIDS

                This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 License, which allows others to remix, tweak, and build upon the work non-commercially, as long as the author is credited and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms.

                Categories
                Original Article

                Sexual medicine
                attitude,awareness,sexually transmitted infection
                Sexual medicine
                attitude, awareness, sexually transmitted infection

                Comments

                Comment on this article