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      Intrinsic mechanisms of neuronal axon regeneration

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      Nature Reviews Neuroscience
      Springer Nature

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          Abstract

          <p class="first" id="P2">Permanent disabilities following CNS injuries result from the failure of injured axons to regenerate and rebuild functional connections with their original targets. By contrast, injury to peripheral nerves is followed by robust regeneration, which can lead to recovery of sensory and motor functions. This regenerative response requires the induction of widespread transcriptional and epigenetic changes in injured neurons. Considerable progress has been made in recent years in understanding how peripheral axon injury elicits these widespread changes through the coordinated actions of transcription factors, epigenetic modifiers and, to a lesser extent, microRNAs. Although many questions remain about the interplay between these mechanisms, these new findings provide important insights into the pivotal role of coordinated gene expression and chromatin remodelling in the neuronal response to injury. </p>

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          Most cited references181

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          Promoting axon regeneration in the adult CNS by modulation of the PTEN/mTOR pathway.

          The failure of axons to regenerate is a major obstacle for functional recovery after central nervous system (CNS) injury. Removing extracellular inhibitory molecules results in limited axon regeneration in vivo. To test for the role of intrinsic impediments to axon regrowth, we analyzed cell growth control genes using a virus-assisted in vivo conditional knockout approach. Deletion of PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog), a negative regulator of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, in adult retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) promotes robust axon regeneration after optic nerve injury. In wild-type adult mice, the mTOR activity was suppressed and new protein synthesis was impaired in axotomized RGCs, which may contribute to the regeneration failure. Reactivating this pathway by conditional knockout of tuberous sclerosis complex 1, another negative regulator of the mTOR pathway, also leads to axon regeneration. Thus, our results suggest the manipulation of intrinsic growth control pathways as a therapeutic approach to promote axon regeneration after CNS injury.
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            Function and regulation of CREB family transcription factors in the nervous system.

            CREB and its close relatives are now widely accepted as prototypical stimulus-inducible transcription factors. In many cell types, these factors function as effector molecules that bring about cellular changes in response to discrete sets of instructions. In neurons, a wide range of extracellular stimuli are capable of activating CREB family members, and CREB-dependent gene expression has been implicated in complex and diverse processes ranging from development to plasticity to disease. In this review, we focus on the current level of understanding of where, when, and how CREB family members function in the nervous system.
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              Therapeutic targeting of microRNAs: current status and future challenges.

              MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are evolutionarily conserved small non-coding RNAs that have crucial roles in regulating gene expression. Increasing evidence supports a role for miRNAs in many human diseases, including cancer and autoimmune disorders. The function of miRNAs can be efficiently and specifically inhibited by chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides, supporting their potential as targets for the development of novel therapies for several diseases. In this Review we summarize our current knowledge of the design and performance of chemically modified miRNA-targeting antisense oligonucleotides, discuss various in vivo delivery strategies and analyse ongoing challenges to ensure the specificity and efficacy of therapeutic oligonucleotides in vivo. Finally, we review current progress on the clinical development of miRNA-targeting therapeutics.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nature Reviews Neuroscience
                Nat Rev Neurosci
                Springer Nature
                1471-003X
                1471-0048
                April 17 2018
                Article
                10.1038/s41583-018-0001-8
                5987780
                29666508
                9b292829-30a6-48da-abf6-bb58c42546f9
                © 2018

                http://www.springer.com/tdm

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